The Master Builder (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Drama
10 Reviews
Written in 1892, later in Ibsen's life, "The Master Builder," or "Bygmester Solness," is a 3-act play that explores the conflicted thoughts and feelings of the hardened and powerful artist Halvard Solness. He is an older architect who painstakingly worked his way to professional distinction at the cost of his personal life. As he reflects on his career, Halvard is frustrated with his ambition and dreams of achieving genuine satisfaction in his life. At the same time, he fears being surpassed by a younger generation of talent, including by his own son, a younger member of the firm. A symbolic and semi-autobiographical play, "The Master Builder" portrays a creative man's confusion and downfall.
  

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Review: The Master Builder

User Review  - Andrea Lakly - Goodreads

From "A Doll's House" and "Enemy of the People" I thought Ibsen was a trail blazer for creating straightforward (maybe simplistic) works about topics people didn't talk about honestly. This ... Read full review

Review: The Master Builder

User Review  - Goodreads

From "A Doll's House" and "Enemy of the People" I thought Ibsen was a trail blazer for creating straightforward (maybe simplistic) works about topics people didn't talk about honestly. This ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

ACT THIRD
59
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Henrik Ibsen, poet and playwright was born in Skein, Norway, in 1828. His creative work spanned 50 years, from 1849-1899, and included 25 plays and numerous poems. During his middle, romantic period (1840-1875), Ibsen wrote two important dramatic poems, Brand and Peer Gynt, while the period from 1875-1899 saw the creation of 11 realistic plays with contemporary settings, the most famous of which are A Doll's House, Ghosts, Hedda Gabler, and The Wild Duck. Henrik Ibsen died in Christiania (now Oslo), Norway in 1906.

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