Faith and Philosophy: Discourses and Essays

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1886 - Theology - 496 pages
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Page 295 - ... but speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ : From whom the whole body fitly joined together, and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body, unto the edifying of itself in love.
Page 455 - It is come, I know not how, to be taken for granted by many persons, that Christianity is not so much as a subject of inquiry, but that it is now at length discovered to be fictitious. And accordingly they treat it as if, in the present age, this were an agreed point among all people of discernment, and nothing remained but to set it up as a principal subject of mirth and ridicule, as it were by way of reprisals for its having so long interrupted the pleasures of the world.
Page 86 - Fear not: for I am with thee: I will bring thy seed from the east, and gather thee from the west; I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back: bring my sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the earth...
Page 297 - HAMILTON. Lectures on Metaphysics. By Sir WILLIAM HAMILTON, Bart. , Professor of Logic and Metaphysics in the University of Edinburgh. Edited by the Rev. HL MANSEL, BD, LL.D., Dean of St Paul's ; and JOHN VEITCH, MA, Professor of Logic and Rhetoric, Glasgow.
Page 299 - ... with their correlatives freedom of choice and responsibility — man being all this, it is at once obvious that the principal part of his being is his mental power. In Nature there is nothing great but Man, In Man there is nothing great but Mind.
Page 43 - Whom art had never taught cliffs, moods, or notes, Should vie with him for mastery, whose study Had busied many hours to perfect practice ; To end the controversy, in a rapture Upon his instrument he plays so swiftly So many voluntaries, and so quick That there was curiosity and cunning, Concord in discord, lines of differing method Meeting in one full centre of delight.
Page 482 - Behold, my servant shall deal prudently, he shall be exalted, and extolled, and be very high. As many were astonied at thee; his visage was so marred more than any man, and his form more than the sons of men...
Page 397 - The condition of man, after the fall of Adam, is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God : wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 88 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 195 - A miracle, as was justly remarked by Brown, is no contradiction to the law of cause and effect; it is a new effect, supposed to be produced by the introduction of a new cause. Of the adequacy of that cause, if it exist, there can be no doubt...

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