The Making of the English Working Class

Front Cover
Open Road Media, Mar 15, 2016 - History - 848 pages
A history of the common people and the Industrial Revolution: “A true masterpiece” and one of the Modern Library’s 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the twentieth century (Tribune).

During the formative years of the Industrial Revolution, English workers and artisans claimed a place in society that would shape the following centuries. But the capitalist elite did not form the working class—the workers shaped their own creations, developing a shared identity in the process. Despite their lack of power and the indignity forced upon them by the upper classes, the working class emerged as England’s greatest cultural and political force. Crucial to contemporary trends in all aspects of society, at the turn of the nineteenth century, these workers united into the class that we recognize all across the Western world today.
 
E. P. Thompson’s magnum opus, The Making of the English Working Class defined early twentieth-century English social and economic history, leading many to consider him Britain’s greatest postwar historian. Its publication in 1963 was highly controversial in academia, but the work has become a seminal text on the history of the working class. It remains incredibly relevant to the social and economic issues of current times, with the Guardian saying upon the book’s fiftieth anniversary that it “continues to delight and inspire new readers.”
 
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface
THE LIBERTY TREE
Members Unlimited
Christian and Apollyon
Satans Strongholds
The Freeborn Englishman
Planting the Liberty Tree
THE CURSE OF ADAM
An Army of Redressers i The Black Lamp
The Opaque Society
The Laws against Combination
Croppers and Stockingers
Sherwood Lads
By Order of the Trade
Demagogues and Martyrs i Disaffection
Problems of Leadership

Exploitation
The Field Labourers
Artisans and Others
The Weavers
Standards and Experiences i Goods
Homes
Life
Childhood
The Transforming Power of the Cross i Moral Machinery
The Chiliasm of Despair
Community i Leisure and Personal Relations
The Rituals of Mutuality
The Irish
Myriads of Eternity
THE WORKINGGLASS PRESENCE XIII Radical Westminster
Hampden Clubs
Brandreth and Oliver
Peterloo
The Cato Street Conspiracy
Class Consciousness i The Radical Culture
William Cobbett
Carlile Wade and Gast
Owenism
A Sort of Machine
Bibliographical Note
Index
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2016)

E. P. Thompson (1924–1993) was a British historian, writer, socialist, and peace campaigner. He is most famous for his work on the British radical movements of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, as well as influential biographies of William Morris and William Blake. An ardent left-wing socialist critic of the Labour governments of 1964–70 and 1974–79 and a historian in the Marxist tradition, Thompson was an active figure in ending the Cold War.
 
 

Bibliographic information