Seahenge: A Quest for Life and Death in Bronze Age Britain

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HarperCollins, 2002 - History - 337 pages
2 Reviews
One of the most haunting and enigmatic archaeological discoveries of recent times was the uncovering in 1998 at low tide of the so-called Seahenge on the north coast of Norfolk. This circle of wooden planks set vertically in the sand, with a large inverted tree-trunk in the middle, likened to a ghostly "hand reaching up from the underworld", has now been dated to around 2020 BC. It focused national attention on archaeology to an extent not seen for many years, and the issues raised by its removal and preservation made it a "cause celebre". Francis Pryor has been at the centre of British archaeological fieldwork for nearly 30 years, piecing together the way of life of Bronze Age people, their settlement of the landscape, their religion and rituals.  "Seahenge" demonstrates how much Western civilization owes to the prehistoric societies that existed in Europe in the last four millennia BC.

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Review: Seahenge: A Quest for Life and Death in Bronze Age Britain

User Review  - 4ZZZ - Goodreads

If I recommended just one book on Archaeology to the beginner this would be it. Read full review

Review: Seahenge: A Quest for Life and Death in Bronze Age Britain

User Review  - Lara - Goodreads

Really interesting in parts, but I found the title and description on the back somewhat deceptive--there's a brief prologue about Seahenge, and then Pryor goes back in time to give background on his ... Read full review

Contents

Setting the Scene
1
The Hunt is On
12
A TransAtlantic Commuter
24
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Francis Pryor is President of the Council for British Archaeology and a prominent field archaeologist who has devoted his professional life to the excavation of wetland landscapes in eastern England. He has been a central figure in the so-called 'Wetland Revolution' of British archaeology, and has published a number of specialist monographs on his discoveries. He appears frequently on TV's Time Team; this is his first book for a wide general audience.

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