Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen, Volumes 2-3

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Westermann, 1847 - Languages, Modern
Vols. for 1858- include "Sitzungen der Berliner Gesellschaft für das Studium der neuren Sprachen."
 

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Page 238 - ... énergiques dans quelque genre que ce puisse être. Un entretien aimable, alors même qu'il porte sur des riens, et que la grâce seule des expressions en fait le charme , cause encore beaucoup de plaisir; on peut l'affirmer sans impertinence, les Français sont presque seuls capables de ce genre d'entretien.
Page 389 - Nay, their endeavour keeps in the wonted pace : but there is, sir, an aiery of children, little eyases, that cry out on the top of question, and are most tyrannically clapped for 't : these are now the fashion...
Page 230 - Esquisse d'un système complet d'Instruction et d'Éducation et de leur histoire, avec indication des principaux ouvrages, qui ont paru sur les différentes branches de la pédagogique surtout en Allemagne.
Page 255 - Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the Reign of Edward I. 2 vols, 8vo, containing upwards of 1,000 pages, closely printed In double columns, cloth, a new and cheaper edition.
Page 232 - Wit and Humour. Selected from the English Poets. With an Illustrative Essay and Critical Comments.
Page 233 - ... hang over them all like a sneaking infection, and hinder our laughter from becoming respectful. The scene in which he is taken blindfold among his old acquaintances, and so led, to vilify their characters under the impression that he is gratifying their enemies, is almost as good as the screen scene in the „School for Scandal — p.
Page 232 - Humour, considered as the object treated of by the humorous writer, and not as the power of treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament ; and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions of thought or feeling more amusing than accountable; at least in the opinion of society.
Page 253 - While scared, as by the lightning's flash, all stood in mute dismay, The boy on his loved master's breast had breathed his soul away: — The old man round the bleeding form his mantle wrapped with speed Raised the dear victim in his arms, and bound him on his steed.
Page 232 - Wit may be defined to be the Arbitrary Juxtaposition of Dissimilar Ideas, for some lively purpose of Assimilation or Contrast, generally of both. It is fancy in its most wilful, and strictly speaking, its least poetical state ; that is to say, Wit does not contemplate its ideas for their own...
Page 253 - ... to the tone, Through all the train each heart confessed the spell of power unknown: And when a clear angelic voice chimed in with youthful fire, 'T'was like the unseen minstrelsy of some ethereal quire!

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