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Books Books 1 - 10 of 25 on Humour, considered as the object treated of by the humorous writer, and not as the....
" Humour, considered as the object treated of by the humorous writer, and not as the power of treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament ; and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions... "
Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen - Page 232
1847
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The Living Age ..., Volume 36

1853
...dissimilar ideas, for some lively purpose of assimilation or contrast, or both; and humor, a tendencv of the mind to run in particular directions of thought or feeling, more amusing than accountable. ''f Taking either of these definitions as a standard, it might seem a feasible allegation that whatever...
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Wit and humour, selected from the English poets; with an illustrative essay ...

Leigh Hunt - English poetry - 1846
...treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament ; and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions...thought or feeling more amusing than accountable; at least in the opinion of society. It is therefore, either in reality or appearance, a thing inconsistent....
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Wit and Humor

Leigh Hunt - English poetry - 1846 - 261 pages
...treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament ; and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions...of thought or feeling more amusing than accountable ; at least in the opinion of society. It is therefore, either in reality or appearance, a thing inconsistent....
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Wit and Humor

Leigh Hunt - English poetry - 1846 - 261 pages
...treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament ; and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions of thought or feeling more amusing ihan accountable ; at least in the opinion of society. It is therefore, either in reality or appearance,...
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The Fine arts' journal

1847
...treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament, and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions...thought or feeling more amusing than accountable, at least, in the opinion of society. It is, therefore, either in reality or appearance, aj thing inconsistent:...
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The Renfrewshire Magazine

1847
...or in ideas ; and it moves us to laughter by the pleasant surprise thereby occasioned. " Humour is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions...thought or feeling — more amusing than accountable. It deals in incongruities of character and circumstance, as wit does in those of arbitrary ideas."...
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The Church of England quarterly review, Volume 21

1847
...themselves, made friends by the very merriment of their introduction." His definition of humour is, "a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions of thought or feeling, more amusing than accountable—at least, in the opinion of society." The illustrative quotations extend from Chaucer...
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Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen, Volume 3

Languages, Modern - 1847
...some lively purpose of assimilation or contrast, generally for foth; — ferner für фигоог: A tendency of the mind to run in particular directions of thought or feeling, more amusing tliun accountable, hierauf jSblt ber 45erau4aeter fclgenbe 14 formen auf, unter »elften ber SB¡$...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 12

1847
...treating it, derives its name from the prevailing quality of moisture in the bodily temperament; and is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions of thought or feeling more amusmg than accountable; at least in the opinion of society. It is therefore, either in reality or...
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The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine, Volume 36

Charles Fenno Hoffman, Lewis Gaylord Clark, John Holmes Agnew, Kinahan Cornwallis, Timothy Flint, Washington Irving - Periodicals - 1850
...straightening the involution of the sentence, it stands thus : ' Humor, considered as the object treated of, is a tendency of the mind to run in particular directions...thought or feeling more amusing than accountable.' If this be not the very idea of humor whiqh the Philistines had when they called for Samson to make...
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