On the Nature and the Existence of God

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T. Scott, 1875 - God - 36 pages
 

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Page 30 - God is law, say the wise; O Soul, and let us rejoice, For if He thunder by law, the thunder is yet His voice. Law is God, say some: no God at all, says the fool; For all we have power to see is a straight staff bent in a pool; And the ear of man cannot hear, and the eye of man cannot see; But if we could see and hear, this Vision — were it not He?
Page 21 - Thou shalt not be afraid for any terror by night, nor for the arrow that flieth by day ; For the pestilence that walketh in darkness, nor for the sickness that destroyeth in the noonday. A thousand shall fall beside thee, and ten thousand at thy right hand ; but it shall not come nigh thee.
Page 15 - ... in the progress from not being into being, is to think that which, in the very thought, annihilates itself. Here again the Pantheistic hypothesis seems forced upon us. We can think of creation only as a change in the condition of that which already exists ; and thus the creature is conceivable only as a phenomenal mode of the being of the Creator.
Page 16 - ... and if there is anything in particular which it actually is, it is thereby excluded from being any other thing. But again, it must also be conceived as actually everything and potentially nothing ; for an unrealised potentiality is likewise a limitation. If the infinite can be...
Page 16 - The Infinite, if it is to be conceived at all, must be conceived as potentially everything and actually nothing; for if there is anything in general which it cannot become, it is thereby limited; and if there is anything in particular which it actually is, it is thereby excluded from being any other thing. But again, it must also be conceived as actually everything and potentially nothing: for an unrealised potentiality is likewise a limitation. If the infinite can be that which it is not, it is...
Page 16 - Consciousness is essentially a limitation ; for it is the determination of the mind to one actual out of many possible modifications. But the Infinite, if it is to be conceived at all...
Page 14 - That which is conceived as absolute and infinite must be conceived as containing within itself the sum, not only of all actual, but of all possible modes of being.
Page 33 - ... freest communion when all alone; was deserted, never forsaken; betrayed, but still safe; crucified, but all the more triumphant. This was the victory of the soul: a man of the highest type. Blessed be God that so much manliness has been lived out, and stands there yet, a lasting monument to mark how high the tides of divine life have risen in the human world.
Page 16 - ... eluded from being any other thing. But again, it " must also be conceived as actually everything and " potentially nothing ; for an unrealized potentiality " is likewise a limitation. If the infinite can be that " which it is not, it is by that very possibility marked " out as incomplete, and capable of a higher perfec
Page 26 - The nature of man has in it certain sentiments and emotions which, reasonably or unreasonably, sway him powerfully and continually ; they are, in fact, his strongest motive powers, overwhelming the reasoning faculties with resistless strength ; true, they need discipline and controlling, but they do not need to be, and they cannot be, destroyed. The sentiments of love, of reverence, of worship, are not, as yet, reducible to logical processes ; they are intuitions, spontaneous emotions, incomprehensible...

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