History of Chicago, Volume 1

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Arno Press, 1884 - Chicago (Ill.)
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Well so far so good! Have not finished. I do love it. I was born there and this hisyory is intriguing. Thank you!

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This is a reasonable quality scan of Volume I of this important three volume series. This volume covers the history of Chicago from its origins to 1857. An invaluable resource about the institutions and personalities of the early city.


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Page 299 - Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O Lord of hosts, my King, and my God.
Page 197 - The navigable waters leading into the Mississippi and St. Lawrence, and the carrying places between the same, shall be common highways, and forever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said territory, as to the citizens of the United States, and those of any other states that may be admitted into the confederacy, without any tax, impost, or duty therefor.
Page 251 - ... the termini set forth in said act, with a single track, and complete the same, ready for the transportation of merchandise and passengers, on or before the fourth day of July, which will be in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-four. And the said railroad shall be, in all respects, as well and thoroughly built as the railroad running from Boston to Albany...
Page 122 - ... the hours of darkness, when the housed portion of the population of Chicago strove to obtain repose in the crowded plank edifices of the village, the Indians howled, sang, wept, yelled, and whooped in their various encampments. With all this, the whites seemed to me to be more pagan than the red men. You will have understood, that the large body of Indians collected in the vicinity consisted not merely of chiefs and warriors, but...
Page 48 - I was three days announcing the faith in all their cabins after which, as we were embarking, they brought me on the water's edge a dying child, which I baptized a little before it expired, by an admirable Providence for the salvation of that innocent soul.
Page 80 - I come to deliver up to you the medal I wear. It was given me by the Americans, and I have long worn it in token of our mutual friendship. But our young men are resolved to imbrue their hands in the blood of the whites. I cannot restrain them, and I will not wear a token of peace while I am compelled to act as an enemy.
Page 35 - Bay and Lake Erie, and from Sandusky to the post which shall be taken at or near the foot of the rapids of the Miami of the lake: and from thence to Detroit. Again, from the mouth of the Chicago, to the commencement of the portage, between that river and the Illinois, and down the Illinois river to the Mississippi...
Page 58 - ... that a person can go from Lake Ontario and Fort Frontenac in a bark to the Gulf of Mexico, there being only one carrying place, half a league in length, where Lake Ontario communicates with Lake Erie. A settlement could be made at this post, and another bark built on Lake Erie. ... He has been within ten days...
Page 277 - House dissenting) had declared that " by the act of the Republic of Mexico a state of war exists between that Government and the United States...
Page 121 - Companies of old warriors might be seen sitting smoking under every bush; arguing, palavering or 'powwowing' with great earnestness; but there seemed no possibility of bringing them to another Council in a hurry.

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