The Radical Right in Switzerland: Continuity and Change, 1945-2000

Front Cover
Berghahn Books, 2009 - History - 470 pages

There has been a tendency amongst scholars to view Switzerland as a unique case, and comparative scholarship on the radical right has therefore shown little interest in the country. Yet, as the author convincingly argues, there is little justification for maintaining the notion of Swiss exceptionalism, and excluding the Swiss radical right from cross-national research. His book presents the first comprehensive study of the development of the radical right in Switzerland since the end of the Second World War and therefore fills a significant gap in our knowledge. It examines the role that parties and political entrepreneurs of the populist right, intellectuals and publications of the New Right, as well as propagandists and militant groups of the extreme right assume in Swiss politics and society. The author shows that post-war Switzerland has had an electorally and discursively important radical right since the 1960s that has exhibited continuity and persistence in its organizations and activities. Recently, this has resulted in the consolidation of a diverse Swiss radical right that is now established at various levels within the political and public arena.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Main Arguments and Structure of the Book
7
The Concept of the Radical Right
13
Success Conditions and Organisational Variation
39
Overforeignization
47
The Movement against
57
Outsiders in the Party System Fringe Parties in the 1980s
77
A Regionalist Antiestablishment Party
114
The New Right in
229
The Subculture
275
Emergence
304
Linkages with
322
Conclusion
331
The 1990s and Beyond
340
References
425
Index
453

Entering the Mainstrearrr The Emergence
123
The New Right in t
173

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Damir Skenderovic is Associate Professor of Contemporary History at the University of Fribourg. Previously, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for European Studies at New York University. His recent publications focus on the radical right, identity politics, migration, and 1968 in Western Europe, with a particular emphasis on Switzerland.

Bibliographic information