Criminal Justice: An Introduction to Philosophies, Theories and Practice

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Psychology Press, 2004 - Social Science - 236 pages
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This new text encourages students to develop a deeper understanding of the context and the current workings of the criminal justice system. The first part offers a clear and comprehensive review of the major philosophical aims and sociological theories of punishment, the history of justice and punishment and the developing perspective of victimology. In the second part, the focus is on the main areas of the contemporary criminal justice system, including the police, the courts and judiciary, prisons and community penalties.

There are regular reflective question breaks which enable students to consider and respond to questions relating to what they have just read and the book contains useful pedagogic features such as boxed examples, leading questions and annotated further reading.

This practical book is particularly geared to undergraduate students following programmes in criminal justice and criminology. It will also prove a useful resource for practitioners who are following vocationally based courses in the criminal justice area – in social work, youth justice and police training courses.

 

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Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
History and theories of crime and punishment
1
1 Why punish? Philosophies of punishment
3
The aims of punishment
5
Deterrence
8
Retribution
12
Rehabilitation
17
4 Victimology
95
Who are the victims?
96
The emergence of victimology
99
Theories and methods of research in victimology
104
Victims of private crime
113
Further reading
130
The criminal justice system
131
5 Police and policing
133

Summary
24
Further reading
26
2 Theories of punishment
27
the work and influence of Durkheim and Weber
28
the Marxist approach
39
the work of Michel Foucault
47
Summary
56
Further reading
57
3 The history of crime and justice
59
before the Bloody Code
62
The eighteenth century and the Bloody Code
65
the late eighteenth century and beyond
68
The police and the emergence of the criminal justice system
72
Twentiethcentury developments
78
Gender
83
Ethnicity
90
Further reading
93
The police role today
145
Police culture
149
Further reading
160
6 The courts sentencing and the judiciary
161
The Crown Prosecution Service
166
principles and issues
167
Sentencing and social divisions
173
The judiciary
178
Further reading
186
7 Prisons and imprisonment
187
the current context
192
experiences and issues
205
Community penalties
211
Further reading
215
References
217
Index
227
Copyright

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References to this book

Criminal Justice
Ursula Smartt
Limited preview - 2006
Criminal Justice
Ursula Smartt
Limited preview - 2006

About the author (2004)

Ian Marsh is Progamme Leader for Criminology at Liverpool Hope University College and is a widely published textbook author. His recent publications include Theory and Practice in Sociology and Sociology: Making Sense of Society. John Cochrane is Lecturer in History and Criminology at Liverpool John Moores University. Gaynor Melville is lecturer in Sociology and Criminology at Liverpool Hope University College.

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