The Battle-field of Bunker Hill: With a Relation of the Action by William Prescott, and Illustrative Documents. A Paper Communicated to the Massachusetts Historical Society, June 10, 1875, with Additions

Front Cover
author, 1876 - Bunker Hill, Battle of, 1775 - 46 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - Plan of the action at Bunker's Hill, on the 17th of June, 1775, between his Majesty's troops under Major General Howe and the rebel forces. By Lieut. Page. The ground plan from an actual survey. By Capt. Montresor.
Page 14 - ... to come. That blood has called both American continents to republican independence, and has awakened the nations of Europe to a sense, and in future, I hope, to the practice of their rights. Such have been the effects of a resistance to oppression, which was, by many pretended wise men of the times, called rashness; while it was duty, virtue; — and has been a signal for the emancipation of mankind.
Page 14 - ... of her triumphs. In the fulness of our hearts we give thanks to Almighty God, who has guided and guarded your high career of peril and renown. Permit us, beloved General, again to welcome you to our borders; to express our ardent hopes, that your valuable life may be prolonged to the utmost limits of earthly happiness; that the land which has been enriched with the dew of your youth, may be...
Page 27 - Warren was cheered by the troops as he entered the redoubt. Colonel Prescott tendered him the command. He again declined. "I have come to serve only as a volunteer, and shall be happy to learn from a soldier of your experience.
Page 14 - Permit us, beloved General, again to welcome you to our bosoms, to express our ardent hopes that your valuable life may be prolonged to the utmost limits of earthly happiness ; that the land which has been enriched with the dew of your youth may be honored as the asylum of your old age ; that the country which now blends your fame with the mild lustre of Washington may henceforth hail you as a citizen of Washington's country; and that, during the residue of your years, you may live amidst the attentions,...
Page 9 - ... a north-easterly point from the fort, and I ordered the train, with two field-pieces, to go and oppose them, and the Connecticut forces to support them...
Page 19 - ... but he would send for reinforcements and refreshments, and had no doubt they would be promptly sent. They were satisfied. He accordingly despatched two men in the course of the forenoon to headquarters, — the last Major, afterwards Governor, Brooks. The latter procured an order for Colonels Stark and Reed of the New Hampshire line to march their regiments to his assistance. They arrived just at the commencement of the battle, and posted their regiments at the rail fence, on the left of the...
Page 14 - ... to express our ardent hopes, that your valuable life may be prolonged to the utmost limits of earthly happiness; — that the land which has been enriched with the dew of your youth, may be honored as the asylum of your old age; — that the country which now blends your fame with the mild lustre of Washington, may henceforth hail you as a citizen of Washington's country; — and that, during the residue of your years, you may live amidst the attentions, as you will forever live in the hearts...
Page 6 - Hill, on the 17th of June, 1775, between His Majesty's Troops, under the Command of Major General Howe, and the Rebel Forces; by Lieutenant Page of the Engineers, who acted as Aide-de-Camp to General Howe in that action. NB The Ground Plan is from an Actual Survey by Captain Montresor.
Page 14 - I beg you, Sir, and the corporation and citizens of Charlestown, to accept the homage of my gratitude for your kind welcome, and for the old sentiments of affection and respect which for so many years I have entertained towards this town.

Bibliographic information