Boswell's Life of Johnson: including their Tour to the Hebrides. By J.W. Croker

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J. Murray, 1860 - Hebrides (Scotland) - 874 pages
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Page 86 - Is not a patron, My Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help?
Page 275 - cries Partridge, with a contemptuous sneer; "why, I could act as well as he myself. I am sure if I had seen a ghost I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did.
Page 86 - I have been lately informed by the proprietor of ' The World,' that two papers, in which my ' Dictionary ' is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge. " When, upon some slight encouragement, I first visited your lordship, I was overpowered, like the rest of mankind, by the enchantment of your address, and could not...
Page 19 - James, whose skill in physic will be long remembered; and with David Garrick, whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend: but what are the hopes of man! I am disappointed by that stroke of death, which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure.
Page 291 - Three poets in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn : The first in loftiness of thought surpass'd ; The next, in majesty ; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go ; To make a third, she join'd the former two : " and a part of a Latin translation of it done at Oxford :
Page 238 - Why, Sir, if you were to read Richardson for the story, your impatience would be so much fretted that you would hang yourself. But you must read him for the sentiment, and consider the story as only giving occasion to the sentiment.
Page 174 - How small, of all that human hearts endure, That part which laws or kings can cause or cure ! Still to ourselves in every place consigned, Our own felicity we make or find : With secret course, which no loud storms annoy, Glides the smooth current of domestic joy.
Page 117 - No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail ; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned;' and at another time, ' A man in a jail has more room, better food, and commonly better company.
Page 187 - Sunday, Oct. 18, 1767. YESTERDAY, Oct. 17, at about ten in the morning, I took my leave for ever of my dear old friend Catherine Chambers, who came to live with my mother about 1724, and has been but little parted from us since. She buried my father, my brother, and my mother. She is now fiftyeight years old. I desired all to withdraw...
Page 157 - Sir, a woman's preaching is like a dog's walking on his hind legs. It is not done well ; but you are surprised to find it done at all.

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