The Modern Part of an Universal History: From the Earliest Account of Time. Compiled from Original Writers. By the Authors of The Antient Part

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S. Richardson, T. Osborne, C. Hitch, A. Millar, John Rivington, S. Crowder, P. Davey and B. Law, T. Longman, and C. Ware, 1762
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Page 121 - Splendor; others have raifed themfelves again by their civil or military Service, while the reft are reduced to the loweft Poverty and Contempt: And two Years ago, there were near three hundred Knears common Soldiers in Prince Menzicofs Regiment of Dragoons.
Page 407 - ... he directed the hands that held it. While he was waiting for the completion of this great work, he thought that as his dominions were but ill peopled, the celibacy of the monks was contrary to nature, and to the public good.
Page 455 - Manchester had been insulted at Venice. That State had broken through their fundamental laws to content the Queen of Great Britain. How noble a picture, of Government, when a Monarch that can force another nation to infringe its constitution, dare not violate his own ! One...
Page 401 - ... the empress landlady, the king of the Romans, the archdukes and the archduchesses are generally their assistants : they entertain people of all nations as their...
Page 492 - ... condition than ever they were yet ; so, by the paternal authority, in virtue of which, by the laws of our empire, any of our subjects may disinherit a son, and give his succession to such other of his sons as he pleases ; and, in quality of sovereign prince, in consideration of the safety of our dominions, we do deprive our...
Page 409 - Ruffians fliould not be drefled in a different manner from thofe who were teaching them the arts and fciences ; becaufe the averfion to foreign nations is too natural to mankind, and too much encouraged by a difference of drefs. The habit of ceremony, which at that time was...
Page 489 - ... the emperor acquainted him with our demands, and exhorted him to return to us, and submit to our will, as being his father and lord ; yet he...
Page 408 - DJ 4. fcenlion 1 fenfvon to the monafteries : yet the patriarchal fee has never been reftored ; but the great revenues of that high dignity are appropriated to the payment of the troops. THESE alterations were at firft productive of fome complaints ; a certain prieft declared in writing, that Peter was antichrift, becaufe he would have no patriarch ; and as the czar encouraged the typographical art, it helped to fpread a multitude of libels againft him. But on the other hand, there ftarted up a prieft,...
Page 20 - Zapomg-Cofaks from all other' people, is, that they never fuffer any woman in their fettlements, as the Amazons are faid not to have fuffered any men among them. The women of thefe Cofaks live in other iflands of the Dnieper. They never marry, nor have any family : all their male children are inrolled as foldiers, and the females are left with their mothers. The brother often has children by his fifter, and the father by his daughter. They know no laws but thofe which cuftom has introduced, founded...
Page 122 - Gentlemen, mod whereof hold their Lands by Knights Service, to appear in War on Horfe-back ; formerly it was fufficient to fend a Man well armed and mounted, but the prefent Czar makes them or their Sons ferve in Perfon, if they cannot buy Intereft enough with his Minifters to be excufed : When they appear in the Field, they are not allowed a Servant, though they may be...

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