House Made of Dawn

Front Cover
University of Arizona Press, 1968 - Fiction - 212 pages
26 Reviews
The magnificent Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of a proud stranger in his native land.

He was a young American Indian named Abel, and he lived in two worlds. One was that of his father, wedding him to the rhythm of the seasons, the harsh beauty of the land, the ecstasy of the drug called "peyote." The other was the world of the twentieth century, goading him into a compulsive cycle of sexual exploits, dissipation, and disgust. Home from a foreign war, he was a man being torn apart, a man descending into hell.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
4
3 stars
8
2 stars
4
1 star
4

Review: House Made of Dawn

User Review  - Silver - Goodreads

I thought this was one of the most beautifully written novels I have read. The prose was truly poetic, and it truly drew me into a vivid world painting wonderful images within my mind and evoking the ... Read full review

Review: House Made of Dawn

User Review  - Brandon - Goodreads

A pretty interesting novel, the structure was really interesting reminds me a little bit of Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury. You kind of have to be ok with not having all the pieces. When I first ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
10
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1968)

Navarre Scott Momaday was born on February 27, 1934 in Lawton, Okla. to Kiowa parents who successfully bridged the gap between Native American and white ways, but remained true to their heritage. Momaday attended the University of New Mexico and earned an M.A and a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1963. A member of the Gourd Dance Society of the Kiowa Tribe, Momaday has received a plethora of writing accolades, including the Academy of American Poets prize for The Bear and the 1969 Pulitzer Prize for fiction for House Made of Dawn. He also shared the Western Heritage Award with David Muench in 1974 for the nonfiction book Colorado: Summer/Fall/Winter/Spring, and he is the author of the film adaptation of Frank Water's novel, The Man Who Killed the Deer. His work, The Names is composed of tribal tales, boyhood memories, and family histories. Another book, The Way to Rainy Mountain, melds myth, history, and personal recollection into a Kiowa tribe narrative. Throughout his writings, Momaday celebrate his Kiowa Native American heritage in structure, theme, and subject matter, often dealing with the man-nature relationship as a central theme and sustaining the Indian oral tradition.

Bibliographic information