Reading and Writing Acquisition: A Developmental Neuropsychological Perspective

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Westview Press, 1996 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 223 pages
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Both biological and educational constraints operate on the reading and writing acquisition process. Virginia Berninger’s book is the first to provide a theoretical framework for integrating the biological and educational perspectives in explaining normal and disabled reading and writing development. The developmental neuropsychological perspective, with its focus on individual differences in brain systems related to reading and writing and on prevention during critical developmental periods, holds promise for helping children achieve their literacy potential.Part 1 draws upon empirical research and conceptual models to justify the theoretical framework. Part 2 offers an overview of Berninger’s ten-year research program on reading and writing acquisition, which was grounded in this theoretical framework. Of particular interest is Chapter 7, which bridges the gap between basic, theory-driven research on learning processes, and practical considerations in assessing, preventing, and remediating reading and writing disabilities.This book provides valuable supplementary reading for advanced undergraduate courses in developmental psychology or literacy and for graduate courses in child neuropsychology, child clinical psychology, school psychology, the psychology of reading and writing, and regular and special education related to reading and writing.

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Contents

Introduction to Part I Chapters 1 Through 3
3
The Individual as the Unit of Analysis and Normal Variation
18
Constraints Versus Causality in Modeling BrainBehavior
24
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Virginia W Berninger, Ph.D., is Professor and Director, Multidisciplinary Learning Disabilities Center, University of Washington.

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