Handbook of the Psychology of Aging

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James E. Birren, Klaus Warner Schaie
Gulf Professional Publishing, 2001 - Medical - 677 pages
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The Handbook of the Psychology of Aging has become the definitive reference source for information on the psychology of adult development and aging. The Fifth Edition provides comprehensive reviews of research on biological and social influences on behavior and age-related changes in psychological function. In addition to covering environmental influences on behavior and aging and gender differences in aging, new chapters in the Fifth Edition discuss wisdom, creativity, and technological change and the older worker. This handbook is an essential reference for researchers in adult development and gerontology and suitable as an advanced textbook for courses on the psychology of aging.
 

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Contents

The History of Geropsychology
3
Structural Equation Modeling in Longitudinal Research on Aging
29
Longitudinal Studies in Aging Research
53
Methodological Issues in Behavioral Intervention Research with the Elderly
78
The Genetics of Behavioral Aging
109
Biological and Social Influences on Behavior
133
Aging and the Human Nervous System
135
AgeRelated Cognitive Change and BrainBehavior Relationships
161
AgeRelated Declines in Motor Control
313
Aging and Memory Cognitive and Biological Perspectives
349
Language Production and Comprehension
378
Emotions over the Life Span
399
Social Relations An Examination of Social Networks Social Support and Sense of Control
427
Gender and Aging Gender Differences and Gender Roles
454
Personality and Aging Flourishing Agendas and Future Challenges
477
Wisdom and Creativity
500

Health Risk Behaviors and Aging
186
Environmental Influences on Aging and Behavior
215
Behavioral Processes and Psychological Functions
239
Changes in Vision and Hearing with Aging
241
Understanding the Role of Attention in Cognitive Aging Research
267
Speed and Timing of Behavioral Processes
288
Mental Health and Aging at the Outset of the TwentyFirst Century
523
Behavior in Social Contexts
545
Technological Change and the Older Worker
547
Elder Abuse and Victimization
569
Quality of Life and the End of Life
592
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About the author (2001)

James E. Birren is currently Associate Director of the Center on Aging at the University of California, Los Angeles, and serves as an adjunct professor in medicine, psychiatry, and biobehavioral sciences. He is also professor emeritus of gerontology and psychology at the University of Southern California. Dr. Birren's previous postions include service as Chief of the section on aging of the National Institute of Mental Health, founding Executive Director and Dean of the Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center of USC, founding Director of the Anna and Harry Borun Center for Gerontological Research at UCLA, and President of the Gerontological Society of America, the Western Gerontological Society, and the Division on Adult Development and Aging of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Birren's many awards include the Brookdale Foundation Award for Gerontological Research, the Sandoz prize for Gerontological Research, and the award for outstanding contribution to gerontology by the Canadian Association of Gerontology. Author of over 250 scholarly publications, Dr. Birren has research interests including how speed of behavior changes with age, the causes and consequences of slowed information processing in the older nervous system, the effect of age on decision-making processes, and the role of expertise in skilled occupations. He has served as a delegate to several White House Conferences on Aging and continues to have a strong interest in developing national priorities for research and education related to issues of aging.

K. Warner Schaie holds an appointment as Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. Hw is also the Evan Pugh Professor Emeritus of Human Development and Psychology at the Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology from the University of Washington, an honorary Dr. phil. from the Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena, Germany, and an honorary Sc.D. degree from West Virginia University. He received the Kleemeier Award for Distinguished Research Contributions and the Distinguished Career Contribution to Gerontology Award from the Gerontological Society of America, the MENSA lifetime career award, and the Distinguished Scientific Contributions award from the American Psychological Association. He is a past president of the APA Division of Adult Development and Aging and currently represents that Division on the APA Council of Representatives. He is author or editor of more than 60 books including the textbook Adult Development and Aging (5th edition, with S. L. Willis) and of all previous editions of the Handbook of the Psychology of Aging (with J. E. Birren or S. L. Willis). He has directed the Seattle Longitudinal Study of cognitive aging since 1956 and is the author of more than 300 journal articles and chapters on the psychology of aging. His current research interest is in the life course of adult intelligence, its antecedents and modifiability, the impact of cognitive behavior in midlife upon the integrity of brain structures in old age, the early detection of risk for dementia, as well as methodological issues in the developmental sciences.