South Africa, Greece, Rome

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Grant Parker
Cambridge University Press, Aug 31, 2017 - ART - 566 pages
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How have ancient Greece and Rome intersected with South African histories? This book canvasses architecture, literature, visual arts and historical memory. Some of the most telling manifestations of classical reception in South Africa have been indirect, for example neo-classical architecture or retellings of mythical stories. Far from being the mere handmaiden of colonialism (and later apartheid), classical antiquity has enabled challenges to the South African establishment, and provided a template for making sense of cross-cultural encounters. Though access to classical education has been limited, many South Africans, black and white, have used classical frames of reference and drawn inspiration from the ancient Greeks and Romans. While classical antiquity may seem antithetical to post-apartheid notions of heritage, it deserves to be seen in this light. Museums, historical sites and artworks, up to the present day, reveal juxtapositions in which classical themes are integrated into South African pasts.
 

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Contents

Classicism in Unexpected Places
3
conceiving empire 53
53
Cecil John Rhodes the Classics and Imperialism 88
88
Reconstructing an Ethos 114
114
conceiving the nation 139
139
Greeks Romans and VolksEducation in the Afrikaanse
213
law virtue and truthtelling 233
233
Legal Thought from Antiquity to the
262
boundary crossers 351
351
Benjamin Farrington and the Science of the Swerve 376
376
Mary Renault and Classics in South
395
Classical Resonances in the Poetry
410
after apartheid 443
443
The Reception of the Electra Myth in YaŽl Farbers
467
Classical Heritage? By Way of an Afterword 485
485
Bibliography 496
496

cultures of collecting 281
281
The Beit Bequest
316
The Groote Schuur
336

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About the author (2017)

Grant Parker teaches Classics and African Studies at Stanford University, California. His research focuses on Roman imperial culture, classical reception, collective memory, and the history of collecting.

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