Inventing the Electronic Century: The Epic Story of the Consumer Electronics and Computer Industries, with a new preface

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Harvard University Press, Jun 30, 2009 - Business & Economics - 352 pages
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Consumer electronics and computers redefined life and work in the twentieth century. In Inventing the Electronic Century, Pulitzer Prize-winning business historian Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. traces their origins and worldwide development. From electronics prime mover RCA in the 1920s to Sony and Matsushita's dramatic rise in the 1970s; from IBM's dominance in computer technology in the 1950s to Microsoft's stunning example of the creation of competitive advantage, this masterful analysis is essential reading for every manager and student of technology.
 

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Inventing the electronic century: the epic story of the consumer electronics and computer industries

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Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Chandler (business history, emeritus, Harvard; Strategy and Structure) offers the first of a two-volume set that compares the institutional history of four major ... Read full review

Contents

Concepts and Approach
1
The United States The Creation and Destruction of a National Industry
13
Japans Paths to Global Conquest
50
The Computer Industry Created in the United States
82
The Computer Industry Recast in the United States
132
Europes Computer Industries Die Japans Industry Challenges
177
7 The Consumer Electronics and Computer Industries as the Electronic Century Begins
216
8 The Significance of the Epic Story
238
Appendices
259
Notes
275
Index
307
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. is Isidor Straus Professor of Business History, Emeritus, at Harvard Business School.

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