History of the United States: From the Discovery of the American Continent, Volume 9

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Little, Brown, 1866 - United States
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Contents

eral orders 80 Fort Washington on the Hudson 81 Defences of
85
The battle of skirmishes 90 The Hessians move up the ride
91
CHAPTER V
97
Blunder of Mifflin 104 Remedied by Washington
104
The city of New York must be abandoned 110 Sullivans recep
109
York must be evacuated 114 His plea to congress 114 He explains
118
Washingtons conduct on the day 122 Character of Gordon as an his
124
Strength of the American position 128 Declaration of the Howes
132
American privateers 134 Army regulations adopted 135 Condition
138
The declaration of independence unites England 141 Speech of Cav
142
dependence 144Fox applauded by Gibbon and Burke 144 Unsat
148
British preparations for a fleet 153 Arnold near Valcour island 154
154
Carletons treatment of his prisoners 156 Carleton lauds at Crown
162
Lees character as a commander 168 His insincerity 169
168
Confidence of John Adams 173 British ships ascend the Hudson
174
Greenes elation 180 He finds fault with Washington 180Howe
182
Putnam crosses into the Jerseys 186 Instructions to Lee 186 Wash
190
Lees disobedience 194American army melting away 195 Greene
196
Slowness of Howe 202 Danger to Philadelphia 202
202
Refuses to join Washington 206 His contest with Heath 206
209
Opinions of Samuel Adams 214 Orders of Putnam 214 The Quak
218
Secures all the boats 219 Proposes reform in the army 219
220
Washingtons watchword 224 Washingtons plan of attack 224
228
ton entered on both sides 23S Conduct of Rail 233 Rails mistakes
234
Measures adopted 238 Washington not appointed dictator 238
247
The New England regiments and the British fiftyfifth 250 Losses
250
Washington
256
Sovereignty of the people 258 Confidence of the Amer
262
Mode of electing the governor 267 Property qualification
270
The Howes at variance with Germain 331 Their new instructions
332
Merit of Koseiuszko 337 Greene at Philadelphia 337 Helplessness
339
CHAPTER XX
345
Arnold 347Retreat of the British 347 They reembark 48 Con
349
He defends himself 353 Howe returns to Bruns
356
Vermont declares independence 360 Its independence opposed by con
362
CHAPTER XXII
368
The British at Fort Ann 370 A thanksgiving 370 Carleton
370
to the council of New York 375 Schuyler despondent 375 Expects
376
Honors to Herkimer 381 Character of the Indian allies 381The
383
marches through Philadelphia 393 Encamps beyond Wilmington 393
393
Final encounter 399Washingtons army at Chester 399 Losses
399
CHAPTER XXIV
405
Small losses of the Americans 411 Loss of the British 411 Bur
413
Capitulation 420 Amount of his losses 420 Causes of the
420
Loss of the American frigate 423 Billingsport deserted 423
423
talions with Cornwallis 428 Washington retreats 428Why victory
430
CHAPTER XXVI
436
Congress has no power to levy taxes 441 Postoffice 441 Import
442
northwest of the Ohio 443 Jealousy of military power 443 Effect
444
tion a contradiction 450 Elements of union 450 Nationality 451
451
Conways discontent 455 Letter of Reed 455 Conduct of Wilkin
457
4G4 His enemies shrink back 464 Gates 464 Mifflin 464 Con
465
press for separatism 470 Washington for union 470 Congress jealous
472
advice of George 478 His penitence in his old age 478 Burgoynes
479
Effect of his speech on the commons 484 Hartleys attempt with
486
esteemed by the best men in England 493 Position of the king
495
THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE 1778
497

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