One Hundred and Forty-five Stories in a Small Box, Volume 1

Front Cover
McSweeney's Books, 2007 - Fiction - 63 pages
118 Reviews
In the grand tradition of Neapolitan ice cream, ZZ Top, and Cerberus, the tri-headed guardian of Hades, this set combines individual, short fiction collections by three talented practitioners of the short-short form. Manguso’s Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape is a series of crystalline recollections of her childhood misadventures; Eggers’ How the Water Feels to the Fishes brings a deadpan absurdism to the intimacy and vision of his earlier work; and Unferth’s rollicking Minor Robberies unleashes a horde of off-kilter characters and their indelible misadventures. Each author’s work comes in its own hardcover, foil-stamped volume, and the three volumes are housed in an elegant slipcase.

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User Review  - amyolivia - LibraryThing

YES!!! Three books, three authors, 145 short stories, endless pleasure. Of course, Dave Eggers' book was my favorite. He has this way of writing that pulls you in, makes you think all these wonderful ... Read full review

Review: One Hundred and Forty Five Stories in a Small Box: Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape, How the Water Feels to the Fishes, and Minor Robberies

User Review  - Hans - Goodreads

Book and box design - 5 stars! Top notch. How the Water Feels to the Fishes - Dave Eggers - 4 stars. Most consistent in style (though perhaps a little too safe at times). I enjoyed reading the stories ... Read full review

Contents

La Pena
7
Deb Olin Unferth
21
Minor Robberies
34
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

SARAH MANGUSO is the author of The Captain Lands in Paradise (2002). With Jordan Davis she coedited the anthology Free Radicals: American Poets Before Their First Books (2004). She lives in Brooklyn, New York, and teaches at the Pratt Institute. Her poems and prose have appeared in The American Poetry Review, The Believer, Boston Review, The London Review of Books, McSweeney's, the New Republic, The Paris Review, and three editions of The Best American Poetry series.

Dave Eggers was born on March 12th, 1970, in Boston, Massachusetts. His family moved to Lake Forest, Illinois when he was a child. Eggers attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, until his parents' deaths in 1991 and 1992. The loss left him responsible for his eight-year-old brother and later became the inspiration for his highly acclaimed memoir "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius". Published in 2000, the memoir was nominated for a nonfiction Pulitzer the following year. Eggers edits the popular "The Best American Nonrequired Reading" published annually. In 1998, he founded the independent publishing house, McSweeney's which publishes a variety of magazines and literary journals. Eggers has also opened several nonprofit writing centers for high school students across the United States. Eggers has written several novels and his title, A Hologram for the King, was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award. His most recent work of fiction, entitled The Circle, was published in 2013.

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