Mona Lisa Overdrive

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Bantam Books, 1989 - Fiction - 308 pages
299 Reviews
Wolf Haas' Detective Brenner series has become wildly popular around the world for a reason: They're timely, edgy stories told in a wry, quirky voice that's often hilarious, and with a protagonist it's hard not to love. In this episode, Brenner-forced out of the police force-tries to get away from detective work by taking a job as the personal chauffeur for two-year-old Helena, the daughter of a Munich construction giant and a Viennese abortion doctor. One day, while Brenner's attention is turned to picking out a chocolate bar for Helena at a gas station, Helena gets snatched from the car. Abruptly out of a job, Brenner decides to investigate her disappearance on his own. With both parents in the public eye, there's no scarcity of leads-the father's latest development project has spurred public protest, and the mother's clinic has been targeted by the zealous leader of an anti-abortion group. Brenner and God is told with a dark humor that leaves no character, including Brenner, unscathed. Haas tells the story of a fallible hero who can be indecisive and world-weary, baffled and disillusioned by what he finds, but who presses forward nonetheless out of a stubborn sense of decency-a two-year-old is kidnapped, so you find her, because that's just what you do.

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I enjoy William Gibson's writing style. - Goodreads
However, the plot of this book is plain hard to follow. - Goodreads
One of the best endings I've ever read. - Goodreads
... ending kind of petered out. - Goodreads
Some of Gibson's finest writing. - Goodreads
A great series, with a wonderful ending. - Goodreads

Review: Mona Lisa Overdrive (Sprawl #3)

User Review  - Leo Walsh - Goodreads

Okay, it took me thirty years to complete the Sprawl Trilogy after starting it, but I'm glad I did. Since "Mona Lisa Overdrive" is excellent -- almost as good as the brilliant "Neuromancer." "Mona ... Read full review

Review: Mona Lisa Overdrive (Sprawl #3)

User Review  - jjonas - Goodreads

A tired conclusion of a trilogy that began so well. After reading the original Neuromancer, which I liked, I expected more of the same from the sequels, Count Zero and this one. However, already CZ ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
10
III
17
Copyright

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Virtual Realism
Michael Heim
Limited preview - 1998
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About the author (1989)

William Gibson was born on March 17, 1948 in Conway, S.C.. He grew up in a small town in Virginia and developed an interest in science fiction. He dropped out of high school and moved to Canada, where he eventually graduated from the University of British Columbia in 1977. Gibson earned his place in science fiction literary history with the publication of Neuromancer in 1984. Considered the first breakthrough novel written in the cyberpunk style, it won the three major science fiction awards; the Phillip K. Dick, The Hugo, and the Nebula. Set in the fast-paced world of the information superhighway, Gibson shows the negative effects of dealing with technology in cyberspace. His other works, including Mona Lisa Overdrive and the screenplay for the film Johnny Mnemonic, are filled with cynicism, high technology, and underground countercultures. Gibson's title, The Peripheral, is a New York Times 2014 bestseller.

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