Interpretation and Overinterpretation

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 5, 1992 - Literary Criticism - 151 pages
1 Review
The limits of interpretation--what a text can actually be said to mean--are of double interest to a semiotician whose own novels' intriguing complexity has provoked his readers into intense speculation as to their meaning. Eco's illuminating and frequently hilarious discussion ranges from Dante to The Name of the Rose, Foucault's Pendulum, to Chomsky and Derrida, and bears all the hallmarks of his inimitable personal style. Three of the world's leading figures in philosophy, literary theory and criticism take up the challenge of entering into debate with Eco on the question of interpretation. Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler and Christine Brooke-Rose each add a distinctive perspective on this contentious topic, contributing to a unique exchange of ideas among some of the foremost and most exciting theorists in the field.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Interpretation and overinterpretation

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Semioticist Eco and three scholars debate whether there are limits to the interpretations of a text and whether the author's intentions are relevant. Eco seeks to limit the degree to which texts can ... Read full review

Contents

Interpretation and history
23
Overinterpreting texts
45
Between author and text
83
The pragmatists progress
99
Palimpsest history
125
Reply
139
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1992)

Umberto Eco was born in Alessandria, Italy on January 5, 1932. He received a doctorate of philosophy from the University of Turin in 1954. His first book, Il Problema Estetico in San Tommaso, was an extension of his doctoral thesis on St. Thomas Aquinas and was published in 1956. His first novel, The Name of the Rose, was published in 1980 and won the Premio Strega and the Premio Anghiar awards in 1981. His other works include Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of the Day Before, and The Prague Cementary.

Bibliographic information