Social Welfare: Structure and Practice

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SAGE Publications, Feb 28, 1995 - Social Science - 341 pages
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The history, motivations, influences and vital issues in social welfare policy and practice are examined in this book. David Macarov explains how social welfare policy originated and how it is maintained through the interaction of five motivations: mutual aid, religion, politics, economics and ideology. He discusses the major contributions to the development of social welfare from the distinguished figures of Martin Luther, Adam Smith and Charles Darwin. The book concludes with an examination of poverty and unemployment and a review of policy responses to these social problems.
 

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Contents

Part I The Nature of Social Welfare
1
Chapter 1 The Scope of Social Welfare
3
Chapter 2 Human Needs
17
Part II Motivations for Social Welfare
31
Chapter 3 Mutual Aid
33
Chapter 4 Social Welfare and the Family
43
Chapter 5 The Use of Families and Other Institutions of Mutual Aid
66
Chapter 6 Religion as a Motivator of Social Welfare
85
Part III Inflences on Social Welfare
181
Chapter 11 The Influence of Martin Luther on Work and Welfare
183
Chapter 12 The Influence of Charles Darwin and Adam Smith on the Development of Social Welfare
206
Part IV Issues in Social Welfare
223
Chapter 13 Persisting Poverty
225
Chapter 14 Persisting Unemployment
239
Chapter 15 From Welfare State to Welfare Society and Welfare Reform
250
Chapter 16 Description Prediction and Prescription
274

Chapter 7 Politics as a Motivator of Social Welfare
107
Chapter 8 Economics as a Motivator of Social Welfare
120
Chapter 9 Ideology as a Motivator of Social Welfare
138
Chapter 10 Isms as IdeologiesRacism Sexism Ageism and Xenophobia
155
References
283
Index
309
About the Author
325
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