Sheridan

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Harper, 1883 - 205 pages
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Page 68 - I allow even that's better than the pains Mrs Prim takes to conceal her losses in front. She draws her mouth till it positively resembles the aperture of a poor's-box, and all her words appear to slide out edgewise, as it were — thus : How do you do, madam? Yes, madam.
Page 46 - Your charms would make me true. To you no soul shall bear deceit, No stranger offer wrong ; But friends in all the aged you'll meet, And lovers in the young.
Page 75 - Thus at our friends we laugh, who feel the dart ; To reach our feelings, we ourselves must smart. Is our young bard so young, to think that he Can stop the full spring-tide of calumny? Knows he the world so little, and its trade? Alas ! the devil's sooner raised than laid.
Page 175 - ... things settled so that 150/. will remove all difficulty. I am absolutely undone and broken-hearted. I shall negotiate for the Plays successfully in the course of a week, when all shall be returned. I have desired Fairbrother to get back the Guarantee for thirty.
Page 181 - Oh ! it sickens the heart to see bosoms so hollow And spirits so mean in the great and high-born ; To think what a long line of titles may follow The relics of him who died — friendless and lorn ! How proud they can press to the fun'ral array Of one whom they shunn'd in his sickness and sorrow : — How bailiffs may seize his last blanket, to-day, Whose pall shall be held up by nobles, to-morrow...
Page 61 - Friendly caution to the newspapers. "It is whispered — "She is a constant attendant at church, and very frequently takes Dr. M'Brawn home with her. "Mr. Worthy is very good to the girl; — for my part, I dare swear he has no ill intention. "What! Major Wesley's Miss Montague? "Lud, ma'am, the match is certainly broke — no creature knows the cause; some say a flaw in the lady's character, and others, in the gentleman's fortune. "To be sure they do say — "I hate to repeat what I hear. "She was...
Page 68 - Can. I am rejoiced you are come, Sir Peter. They have been so censorious — and Lady Teazle as bad as any one.
Page 115 - Honourable Gentleman, the elegant sallies of his thought, the gay effusions of his fancy, his dramatic turns and his epigrammatic point; and if they were reserved for the proper stage, they would, no doubt, receive what the Honourable Gentleman's abilities always did receive, the plaudits of the audience; and it would be his fortune "sui plauau gaudsre theatri." But this was not the proper scene for the exhibition of those elegancies.
Page 63 - Tis very true. She generally designs well, has a free tongue and a bold invention; but her colouring is too dark, and her outlines often extravagant. She wants that delicacy of tint, and mellowness of sneer, which distinguish your ladyship's scandal. Lady Sneer.
Page 123 - ... the rest of their lives. What must my feelings be, you only can imagine. To tell you the truth, it is with some difficulty that I can ' let down my mind,

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