Grammars of Space: Explorations in Cognitive Diversity

Front Cover
Stephen C. Levinson, David P. Wilkins
Cambridge University Press, Sep 14, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines
Spatial language - that is, the way languages structure the spatial domain – is an important area of research, offering insights into one of the most central areas of human cognition. In this collection, a team of leading scholars review the spatial domain across a wide variety of languages. Contrary to existing assumptions, they show that there is great variation in the way space is conceptually structured across languages, thus substantiating the controversial question of how far the foundations of human cognition are innate. Grammars of Space is a supplement to the psychological information provided in its companion volume, Space in Language and Cognition. It represents a new kind of work in linguistics, 'Semantic Typology', which asks what are the semantic parameters used to structure particular semantic fields. Comprehensive and informative, it will be essential reading for those working on comparative linguistics, spatial cognition, and the interface between them.
 

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Contents

2 Towards an Arrernte grammar of space
24
X
36
3
63
4
115
yardayiwurdany
150
5 The language of space in Yelˆı Dnye
157
Table 51 Some postpositions related to in and on notions
168
Direction of hills South Direction of sea North
184
8
273
9 Approaching space in Tiriyo grammar
311
Probable sources
318
arm
319
Probable sources
320
10 Elements of the grammar of space in Ewe
359
11 Spatial language in Tamil
400
12 A grammar of space in Japanese
437

6 Prolegomena to a Kilivila grammar of space
206
7
230
Yucatan
234
Active 4
250
bajt
259
13 Some properties of spatial description in Dutch
475
towards a semantic typology
512
One general preposition marking oblique phrases
529
Pathdirection
540

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About the author (2006)

Stephen C. Levinson is Director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, and Professor of comparative linguistics at Radboud University, Nijmegen.

David Wilkins is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Speech and Communication Studies at San Francisco State University, and a research scientist in the Center for Aphasia and Related Disorders, VANCHCS Martinez, California.

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