Mummy Wheat: Egyptian Influence on the Homeric View of the Afterlife and the Eleusinian Mysteries

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University Press of America, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 233 pages
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"Homer presents a world-view in which death represents the end of consciousness and total annihilation of personhood. Yet in Odyssey, Book Four, he contradicts this by saying that one man at least will not die, but will be transported to Elysium, where he will have a blessed existence forever. In Mummy Wheat R. Drew Griffith argues that this shocking violation of Homer's normal world-view comes from Egypt, where more than anywhere else in the ancient world people firmly believed in life after death. This Egyptian view entered Homer deeply enough that traces of it can be found in many facets of his poetic language. Finally, Griffith argues, the Elysium idea did not die with Homer, but became enshrined in one of the most influential and long-lived religious traditions of Greece: the mysteries of Demeter at Eleusis outside of Athens."--BOOK JACKET.

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Contents

Brought forth from the Land of Egypt
1
The Voice of the Dead
31
The Origin of Memnon
45
Mechanism of Contact
67
Resuscitation as Psychotherapy
83
Notes
97
Bibliography
191
Index of Modem Persons
221
About the Author
235
Copyright

About the author (2008)

R. Drew Griffith is Professor of Classics at Queen's University at Kingston, Canada.

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