The Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States of America: From the Signing of the Definitive Treaty of Peace, 10th September, 1783, to the Adoption of the Constitution, March 4, 1789 ...

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Blair & Rives, 1837 - United States
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Contents


Thomas Jefferson to John Jay Paris February 14 1787 40 Having written via London the death of the Count do Vergennes transmits
41
to Mexico recapitulated An arret relative to stock fish Thomas Jefferson to William Carmichael Paris June 141787 52 Returns to Paris Funds of the U...
54
to obtain the ultimate decision of his Majestys Council Thomas Jefferson to John Adams Paris November 131787
113
Thomas Jefferson to John Adams Paris December 121787
120
John Jay to Thomas Jefferson June 9 1788 144 Letters acknowledged to the 16th March Copies of several acts transmitted
141
Thomas Jefferson to William Carmichael Paris August
185
in return the privileges of Americans From the same to the same May 16 1788 141 Accession of Maryland to the number of States which have adopt...
192
Critical situation of American credit Offers to proceed to Holland Thomas Jefferson to John Adams Paris March 2 1788 143 Determines to meet Mr ...
208
importation of foreign oils September 28 1788 p 236 Thomas Jefferson to Count de Montmorin Paris October 23 1788 238 Relative to the arret proh...
253
definitive answer thinks the last million loan in Holland may be counted upon From the same to the same Paris January 14 1789
266
Thomas Jefferson to John Jay Paris March 12 1789
275
Thomas Jefferson to John Jay Paris May 9 1789
285
new American Cabinet American affairs Affairs of France Thomas Jefferson to John Jay Paris August 12 1789 317 The National Assembly how occu...
317
European affairs From the same to the same Havre September 30 1789 330 Proceeds to Cowes and thence to Norfolk in Virginia Will go directly
332
Resolution limiting the period of service to Ministers and others to three years February 18 1785
339
John Jay to John Adams Office for Foreign Affairs November
344
of State transmitted Nos 1 2 3 4 5 John Jay to John Adams March 31 1785 348 Transmits a certified copy of an act of Congress of the 21st instant p ...
349
and unanimity of his fellowcitizens From the same to the same Grosvenor Square Westminster Octo
491
probably disapprove of them John Jay to John Adams New York December 5 1785
501
Copies of papers referred to with the report of Mr Jay thereon pp 516525 John Adams to John Jay Grosvenor Square Westminster Novem
525
ion of their Lordships on the conduct of Captain Stanhope p 545 John Adams to John Jay Grosvenor Square December 15 1785 548 Mysterious mo...
549
with regard to hospitality From the same to the same Grosvenor Square December
555
absent himself as little as possible John Adams to John Jay Grosvenor Square February 91786
563
might be borrowed in Holland From the same to the same Grosvenor Square February 22 1786
571
chants Copies of said papers pp 581648 Report of Secretary Jay on the letter of 4th March and enclo
591
tions upon the situation of America John Jay to John Adams New York February 211787
683
future Charg? dAffaires Will embark for America in the spring of 1788 From the same to the same London January 27 1787 693 Treaty with Moroc...
700
Encloses a note from Lord Caermarthen Grosvenor Square January 26 1787 p 732 Transmits a petition relative to East India seamen p 732 Report of...
736
From the same to the same Grosvenor Square May 11787
745
dam May 18 1787 p 754 John Jay to John Adams Office for Foreign Affairs July 31 1787 756 Letters acknowledged to the 23d May Transmits sund...
786
the Secret Journals of Congress September 24 1787 p 793 From the same to the same Office for Foreign Affairs October 16 1787
796
Observations on such missionsunknown and informal Chevalier del Pinto to John Adams London September 7 1787 803 On an exchange of Ministe...
804
1787 p 814 From the same to the same Grosvenor Square November 15 1787 814 Attack upon M Dumas Hints in the English papers of his friendship
817
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Page 585 - It is agreed that creditors on either side shall meet with no lawful impediment to the recovery of the full value in sterling money, of all bona fide debts heretofore contracted.
Page 442 - East by a line to be drawn along the middle of the river St. Croix, from its mouth in the bay of Fundy to its source, and from its source directly north to the aforesaid highlands which divide the rivers that fall into the Atlantic ocean from those which fall into the river St. Lawrence...
Page 364 - ... his Britannic Majesty shall, with all convenient speed, and without causing any destruction, or carrying away any negroes or other property of the American inhabitants...
Page 415 - ... scholars of every faculty, cultivators of the earth, merchants, artisans, manufacturers, and fishermen, unarmed and inhabiting unfortified towns, villages, or places, and in general all persons whose occupations are for the common subsistence and benefit of mankind, shall be allowed to continue their respective employments unmolested in their persons.
Page 760 - United States : and that persons of any other description shall have free liberty to go to any part or parts of...
Page 412 - But in the case supposed of a vessel stopped for articles of contraband, if the master of the vessel stopped will deliver out the goods supposed to be of contraband nature, he shall be admitted to do it, and the vessel shall not in that case be carried into any port, nor further detained, but shall be allowed to proceed on her voyage.
Page 444 - Lawrence; comprehending all islands within twenty leagues of any part of the shores of the United States, and lying between lines to be drawn due east from the points where the aforesaid boundaries between Nova Scotia on the one part, and East Florida on the other, shall respectively touch the Bay of Fundy and the Atlantic Ocean; excepting such islands as now are, or heretofore have been, within the limits of the said province of Nova Scotia.
Page 125 - This reliance cannot deceive us, as long as we remain virtuous ; and I think we shall be so, as long as agriculture is our principal object, which will be the case while there remain vacant lands in any part of America. When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become corrupt as in Europe, and go to eating one another as they do there.
Page 123 - Let me add that a bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference.
Page 543 - Majesty shall with all convenient speed, and without causing any destruction, or carrying away any negroes or other property of the American inhabitants, withdraw all his armies, garrisons and fleets from the said United States, and from every...

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