The Institutes of Law: A Treatise of the Jurisprudence as Determined by Nature

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1880 - Jurisprudence - 572 pages
 

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Page 451 - More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice Rise like a fountain for me night and day. For what are men better than sheep or goats That nourish a blind life within the brain, If, knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer Both for themselves and those who call them friend? For so the whole round earth is every way Bound by gold chains about the feet of God.
Page 45 - When one cultivates to the utmost the principles of his nature, and exercises them on the principle of reciprocity, he is not far from the path. What you do not like when done to yourself, do not do to others.
Page 336 - He put the vision by ; Let dusky Indians whine and kneel ; An English lad must die. And thus, with eyes that would not shrink, With knee to man unbent, Unfaltering on its dreadful brink, To his red grave he went.
Page 44 - The Master went out, and the other disciples asked, saying, "What do his words mean?" Tsang said, " The doctrine of our master is to be true to the principles of our nature and the benevolent exercise of them to others, — this and nothing more.
Page 110 - For hatred does not cease by hatred at any time: hatred ceases by love, this is an old rule.
Page 125 - While there are no stirrings of pleasure, anger, sorrow or joy, the mind may be said to be in the state of EQUILIBRIUM. When those feelings have been stirred, and they act in their due degree, there ensues what may be called the state of HARMONY. This EQUILIBRIUM is the great root from which grow all the human actions in the world, and this HARMONY is the universal path which they all should pursue. Let the states of equilibrium and harmony exist in perfection, and a happy order will prevail throughout...
Page 177 - It may. In the Prayers it is said, ' Prayer has been made to the spirits of the upper and lower worlds.
Page 335 - Poor, reckless, rude, low-born, untaught, Bewildered, and alone, A heart, with English instinct fraught, He yet can call his own. Ay, tear his body limb from limb, Bring cord, or axe, or flame : He only knows, that not through him Shall England come to shame.
Page 254 - All human laws are, properly speaking, only declaratory ; they may alter the mode and application, but have no power over the substance of original justice.
Page 333 - Who never looked before. To-day, beneath the foeman's frown, He stands in Elgin's place, Ambassador from Britain's crown, And type of all her race. Poor, reckless, rude, low-born, untaught, Bewildered, and alone, A heart with English instinct fraught He yet can call his own. Ay, tear his body limb from limb, Bring cord or axe or flame, He only knows that not through him Shall England come to shame.

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