The Pueblo Revolt: The Secret Rebellion That Drove the Spaniards Out of the Southwest

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Simon and Schuster, Jun 30, 2008 - History - 288 pages
The dramatic and tragic story of the only successful Native American uprising against the Spanish, the Pueblo Revolt of 1680.

With the conquest of New Mexico in 1598, Spanish governors, soldiers, and missionaries began their brutal subjugation of the Pueblo Indians in what is today the Southwestern United States. This oppression continued for decades, until, in the summer of 1680, led by a visionary shaman named Pope, the Puebloans revolted. In total secrecy they coordinated an attack, killing 401 settlers and soldiers and routing the rulers in Santa Fe. Every Spaniard was driven from the Pueblo homeland, the only time in North American history that conquering Europeans were thoroughly expelled from Indian territory.

Yet today, more than three centuries later, crucial questions about the Pueblo Revolt remain unanswered. How did Pope succeed in his brilliant plot? And what happened in the Pueblo world between 1680 and 1692, when a new Spanish force reconquered the Pueblo peoples with relative ease?

David Roberts set out to try to answer these questions and to bring this remarkable historical episode to life. He visited Pueblo villages, talked with Native American and Anglo historians, combed through archives, discovered backcountry ruins, sought out the vivid rock art panels carved and painted by Puebloans contemporary with the events, and pondered the existence of centuries-old Spanish documents never seen by Anglos.
 

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User Review  - setnahkt - LibraryThing

This is a “popular” history, distinguished by the author injecting first person observations into a recounting of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 to 1692, when Spanish settlers were temporarily forced out ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - untraveller - LibraryThing

Entertaining and engaging, yet it falls short of the previous book in that there is much too much subjectivity in the book. Roberts (whose other books I've enjoyed) is more focused on shooting down ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
1
The Knotted Cord
9
The Coming of the Kachinas
29
Oñate
70
Troublous Times
98
Popés Apotheosis
127
The Bloodless Reconquest
169
Diaspora
211
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

David Roberts is the author of twenty-four books on mountaineering, adventure, and the history of the American Southwest. His essays and articles have appeared in National Geographic, National Geographic Adventure, and The Atlantic Monthly, among other publications. He lives in Watertown, Massachusetts.

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