Sacred Harmony: The Best Poetical Pieces of the Most Eminent Christian Poets and Writers of England and America

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C. Daly, 1838 - Religious poetry - 304 pages
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Page 51 - THE spacious firmament on high, With all the blue ethereal sky, And spangled heavens, a shining frame, Their great Original proclaim. The unwearied sun from day to day Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an almighty hand. Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes Up the wondrous tale, And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth ; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they...
Page 116 - God! when thou Dost scare the world with tempests, set on fire The heavens with falling thunderbolts, or fill. With all the waters of the firmament. The swift dark whirlwind that uproots the woods And drowns the villages ; when, at thy call.
Page 114 - But thou art here — thou fill'st The solitude. Thou art in the soft winds That run along the summit of these trees In music ; thou art in the cooler breath That from the inmost darkness of the place Comes, scarcely felt — the barky trunks, the ground, The fresh moist ground, are all instinct with thee.
Page 13 - Deep horror then my vitals froze, death-struck, -I ceased the tide to stem; when suddenly a star arose — it was the Star of Bethlehem.
Page 264 - TRIUMPHAL arch, that fill'st the sky When storms prepare to part, I ask not proud Philosophy To teach me what thou art. Still seem as to my childhood's sight, A midway station given — For happy spirits to alight Betwixt the earth and heaven.
Page 113 - Father, Thy hand Hath reared these venerable columns. Thou Didst weave this verdant roof. Thou didst look down Upon the naked earth, and forthwith rose All these fair ranks of trees.
Page 23 - Ye Ice-falls! ye that from the mountain's brow Adown enormous ravines slope amain Torrents, methinks, that heard a mighty voice, And stopped at once amid their maddest plunge! Motionless torrents! silent cataracts! Who made you glorious as the Gates of Heaven Beneath the keen full moon? Who bade the sun Clothe you with rainbows? Who, with living flowers Of loveliest blue, spread garlands at your feet? GOD! let the torrents, like a shout of nations, Answer! and let the ice-plains echo, GOD!
Page 20 - Hark! they whisper; angels say, Sister spirit, come away. What is this absorbs me quite ? Steals my senses, shuts my sight, Drowns my spirits, draws my breath ? Tell me, my soul, can this be death ? The world recedes; it disappears!
Page 264 - And as if strength were given him of God, He rose up calmly and composed the pall Firmly and decently, — and left him there, As if his rest had been a breathing sleep.
Page 10 - THERE is an eye that never sleeps Beneath the wing of night ; There is an ear that never shuts, When sink the beams of light. 2 There is an arm that never tires, When human strength gives way ; There is a love that never fails, When earthly loves decay.

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