The Painter in Oil; a Complete Treatise on the Principles and Technique Necessary to the Painting of Pictures in Oil Colors

Front Cover
Lee and Shepard, 1898 - Painting - 405 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
7
III
10
IV
19
V
24
VI
37
VII
65
VIII
69
IX
73
XXII
142
XXIII
150
XXIV
155
XXV
170
XXVI
188
XXVII
211
XXVIII
213
XXIX
240

XI
80
XII
87
XIII
89
XIV
99
XVI
107
XVII
111
XVIII
114
XIX
125
XX
127
XXI
130
XXX
246
XXXI
249
XXXII
264
XXXIII
284
XXXIV
313
XXXV
279
XXXVI
291
XXXVII
315
XXXIX
333

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 123 - Know thyself," was the inscription over the Oracle at Delphi. And it is still the most difficult task any of us faces. But until you truly know yourself, strengths and weaknesses, know what you want to do and why you want to do it, you cannot succeed in any but the most superficial sense of the word.
Page 193 - It is a satisfaction to the artist to know that this is so ; because although he will never compose color-schemes by the aid of mathematics, it gives him solid ground to stand on, and it diminishes the assurance of the man who claims the right to assert his opinion on color because "one man's taste is as good as another's.
Page 204 - ... it, the waves or vibrations of the color rays blend by overlapping as they come side by side to the eye ; and so the color, made up of the two waves as they blend, is so much more vibrant and full of life. "Yellow and Purple."—It is this principle which is the cause of the peculiarity in the technique of certain "Impressionist
Page 92 - We, at any rate, hold ourselves morally bound to " try all things and hold fast to that which is good " ; and among public benefactors, we reckon him who explodes old error, as next in rank to him who discovers new truth.
Page 254 - Nature is economical. She puts her lights and darks only where she needs them.
Page 171 - ... it could not be a work of art at all: it would be merely a more or less exact representation of something, a mere prosaic description, the interest in which would lie wholly in the fact, and would perish whenever interest in the fact should cease.
Page 156 - The art of clair-obscure, therefore, teaches the painter the disposition and arrangement in general of his lights and darks, with all their degrees, extreme and intermediate, of tint and shade, both in single objects, as the parts of a picture, and in combination as one whole, so as to produce the best representation possible in the best manner possible; that is, so as to produce the most desirable effect upon the senses and spirit of the observers.
Page 155 - Italian compound word whose two parts, chiar and oscuro, signify simply bright and obscure, or light and dark. Hence the art or branch of art that bears the name regards all the relations of light and shade, and this independently of coloring, notwithstanding that in painting, coloring and the clair-obscure are of their very nature inseparable. The art of clair-obscure, therefore, teaches the painter the disposition and...

Bibliographic information