Up from Slavery: An Autobiography

Front Cover
BoD – Books on Demand, Apr 5, 2018 - Fiction - 180 pages
Reproduction of the original: Up from Slavery: An Autobiography by Booker T. Washington
 

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User Review  - erwinkennythomas - LibraryThing

Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington presents a positive outlook about race relations in America. Washington’s life began as a slave on a plantation in Franklin County, Virginia. He described many ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lydia1879 - LibraryThing

Articulate, and an incredible story. Washington tells of how he worked to become the principal of the Tuskegee Institute for African American people. By sheer force of will and determination, this man ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
2
Section 3
3
Section 4
9
Section 5
20
Section 6
30
Section 7
41
Section 8
50
Section 12
80
Section 13
88
Section 14
96
Section 15
104
Section 16
114
Section 17
125
Section 18
136
Section 19
151

Section 9
57
Section 10
65
Section 11
72
Section 20
164
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Booker Taliaferro Washington, 1856 - 1915 Booker T. Washington was born a slave in Hales Ford, Virginia, near Roanoke. After the U.S. government freed all slaves in 1865, his family moved to Malden, West Virginia. There, Washington worked in coal mines and salt furnaces. He went on to attend the Hampton, Virginia Normal and Agricultural Institute from 1872-1875 before joining the staff in 1879. In 1881 he was selected to head the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, a new teacher-training school for blacks, which he transformed into a thriving institution, later named Tuskegee University. His controversial conviction that blacks could best gain equality in the U.S. by improving their economic situation through education rather than by demanding equal rights was termed the Atlanta Compromise, because Washington accepted inequality and segregation for blacks in exchange for economic advancement. Washington advised two Presidents, Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, on racial problems and policies, as well as influencing the appointment of several blacks to federal offices. Washington became a shrewd political leader and advised not only Presidents, but also members of Congress and governors. He urged wealthy people to contribute to various black organizations. He also owned or financially supported many black newspapers. In 1900, Washington founded the National Negro Business League to help black business firms. Washington fought silently for equal rights, but was eventually usurped by those who ideas were more radical and demanded more action. Washington was replaced by W. E. B. Du Bois as the foremost black leader of the time, after having spent long years listening to Du Bois deride him for his placation of the white man and the plight of the negro. He died in 1915.

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