The Naming of Names: The Search for Order in the World of Plants

Front Cover
A&C Black, Dec 15, 2010 - History - 480 pages
3 Reviews
For centuries, some of the most brilliant minds in Europe searched for the rules of nature's game. In a world full of plagues and poisons, many medicines were made from plant extracts and there was a practical need to differentiate between one plant and another. Alongside this was an overwhelming desire to make sense of the natural world. Scholars, aided by the artists who painted the first pictures of plants, set out looking, writing and classifying, but 2,000 years were to pass before any rules became clear. Anna Pavord takes us on an exhilarating and fascinating journey through botanical history, travelling from Athens in the third century BC, through Constantinople and Venice, Padua and Pisa to the present day.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jjwilson61 - LibraryThing

I was expecting a book on the history of taxonomy for plants and what I got was a bunch of brief biographies on mostly medieval, mostly German, herbalists who had printed various volumes listing ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AJBraithwaite - LibraryThing

The extent of my awareness of the naming of plants a few weeks ago was 'Isn't that something to do with Linnaeus?'. Well, this book has put me right in a big way. Linnaeus features only in the ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
IN THE BEGINNING
ALL MEN BY NATURE DESIRE TO KNOW
THE ALEXANDRIAN LIBRARY
PLINY THE PLAGIARIST
THE MEDICINE
JULIANAS BOOK
THE ARAB INFLUENCE
THE IRASCIBLE FUCHS
IN ITALY
THE FIRST BOTANIC GARDEN
THE LONGNOSED NITPICKER
WEAVING THE
PROTESTANTS PREVAIL
GESNERS MASTERPIECE XIX NEW PASTURES
PLANTING TEAM XXI THE LAST OF THE HERBALS

OUT OF THE BLACK HOLE
THE IMAGE MAKERS
THEOPHRASTUS REBORN
BRUNFELSS BOOK
ENGLISHACHIEVEMENTS
THE AMERICAN CONNECTION
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Anna Pavord is the gardening correspondent for the Independent and the author of eight previous books, including the bestselling The Tulip. She contributes to a number of magazines, both in the US and the UK, and regularly fronts programmes for BBC Radio 3 and 4. She chairs the Gardens Panel of the National Trust and sits on the Parks and Gardens Panel of English Heritage.


She lives in Dorset, England, where she spent thirty years restoring the garden of an old rectory. She has recently moved to a new house and started another garden. She is married and has three daughters.

Bibliographic information