The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volume 2

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Page 306 - I found everywhere there (though my understanding had little to do with all this) ; and, by degrees, with the tinkling of the rhyme and dance of the numbers, so that I think I had read him all over before I was twelve years old, and was thus made a poet as immediately as a child is made an eunuch.
Page 286 - And they said, Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Page 262 - I NEVER had any other desire so strong, and so like to covetousness, as that one which I have had always, that I might be master at last of a small house and large garden, with very moderate conveniences joined to them, and there dedicate the remainder of my life only to the culture of them, and study of nature...
Page 303 - ... of praise from him. There is no danger from me of offending him in this kind ; neither my mind, nor my body, nor my fortune, allow me any materials for that vanity.
Page 264 - I myself am able yet to do, is only to recommend to mankind the search of that felicity, •which you instruct them how to find and to enjoy.
Page 177 - ... lastly, for there is no end of all the particulars of his glory, to bequeath all this with one word to his posterity ; to die with peace at home, and triumph abroad ; to be buried among kings, and with more than regal solemnity ; and to leave a name behind him, not to be...
Page 323 - And because the truth is, we want good poets (I mean we have but few), who have purposely treated of solid and learned, that is, natural matters (the most part indulging to the weakness of the world, and feeding it either with the follies of love, or with the fables of gods and heroes...
Page 311 - Instead of art and luxury in food, Let mirth and freedom make thy table good. If any cares into thy day-time creep, At night, without wine's opium, let them sleep. Let rest, which nature does to darkness wed, And not lust, recommend to thee thy bed. Be satisfied, and pleas'd with what thou art, Act chearfully and well th' allotted part ; Enjoy the present hour, be thankful for the past, And neither fear, nor wish, th
Page 251 - Sometimes he lops the barren trees around, And grafts new life into the fruitful wound ; Sometimes he shears his flock, and sometimes he Stores up the golden treasures of the bee.
Page 241 - Behold the original and primitive nobility of all those great persons, who are too proud now, not only to till the ground, but almost to tread upon it. We may talk what we please of lilies, and lions rampant, and spread eagles in fields d'or, or d'argent, but if heraldry were guided by reason, a plough in a field arable, would be the most noble and ancient arms.

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