Beyond Memory: Recording the History, Moments and Memories of South African Music

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African Minds, 2008 - History - 360 pages
5 Reviews
"South Africa possesses one of the richest popular music traditions in the world - from marabi to mbaqanga, from boeremusiek to bubblegum, from kwela to kwaito. Yet the risk that future generations of South Africans will not know their musical roots is very real. Of all the recordings made here since the 1930s, thousands have been lost for ever, for the powers-that-be never deemed them worthy of preservation. If one peruses the books that exist on South African popular music, one still finds that their authors have on occasion jumped to conclusions that were not as foregone as they had assumed. Yet the fault lies not with them, rather in the fact that there has been precious little documentation in South Africa of who played what, or who recorded what, with whom, and when. This is true of all music-making in this country, though it is most striking in the music of the black communities. Beyond memory: recording the history, moments and memories of South African music is an invaluable publication becauseit offers a first-hand account of the South African music scene of the past decades from the pen of Max Thamagana Mojapelo, who was situated in the very thick of things, thanks to his job as a DJ at the South African Broadcasting Corporation. This book -astonishing for the breadth of its coverage - is based on his diaries, on interviews he conducted and on numerous other sources, and we find in it not only the well-known names of recent South African music but a countless host of others whose contribution must be recorded if we and future generations are to gain an accurate picture of South African music history of the late 20th and early 21st centuries"--Publisher's description.
 

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Hello Max -
I have good reason to update you on your facts in one area of your works - Page 261 - you refer to 'Fred Langford' as being 'the man' of the Golden City Dixies and intimates that the
show was his.
He was merely the manager and in fact my father owned the concern, the late Doug Doull - an attorney at the firm Livingston, Doull, Winterton & Essery (in those days) of Durban, had taken Fred under his wing when he was a youngster as he was headed on a path to nowhere and gave him purpose and a chance at improving his lot - which had some major up's and downs I might add!
However I was indeed one of the luckiest youngsters around back in those days as I had 'full' access to the music world whenever the show was in Durban and I knew then that my being able to meet these musicians from various walks of life in that apartheid era was in fact what made me privileged.
I was also exposed to the night club scene back then and met many people of the day whom the government had shunned including Ronnie Madonsela!
Lest not we forget Mahlathini! My heart races when I hear his music being played on radio and when I tell the listener whose radio it is playing on who's music it is they are always astounded that I know!
The S.A.P. of the day did not favor my Dad in any way and you can imagine just by this that I had an upbringing that was correct in every way. How thankful I am to this day for having had a Dad who absolutely loved music and passed this on to me as did he his unswerving knowledge of peoples rights no matter who they were or from whence they came - "September '77 - Peter Gabriel - Biko" - My Dad died in 1980.
What a great piece you have created here.
The best to you.
Peter Doull
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Hi you forget Katlehong Vibrations Pantsula, the overall winners in 1989 SHELL ROAD TO FAME TALENT SEARCH

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Contents

V
1
VI
38
VII
50
VIII
67
IX
72
X
84
XI
115
XII
122
XVI
195
XVII
201
XVIII
223
XIX
263
XX
293
XXI
303
XXII
308
XXIII
319

XIII
136
XIV
157
XV
166

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