The Great Plague

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Amberley Publishing, 2009 - History - 192 pages
2 Reviews
Plague has been the most feared disease across Europe since the Black Death in the 1340s. Dreaded because of the scale of the mortality and its sheer foulness, its periodic outbreaks had a devastating impact. London's last and most destructive attack came in 1665, when, according to Bishop Gilbert Burnet, 'a most terrible plague broke out, that depopulated the city of London, ruined the trade of the nation, and swept away about a hundred thousand persons'. Roughly one-fifth of the city's population died, most of them within just eight months. The epidemic was not confined to London; East Anglia and southern England also suffered, and it spread as far north as Tyneside and Wearside. Places such as Colchester, Winchester, Southampton, Norwich and, the most famous case of all, Eyam in Derbyshire, suffered a higher proportion of deaths than did London. It is small wonder that Daniel Defoe described 1665 as 'this calamitous Year'.
 

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THE GREAT PLAGUE

User Review  - Kirkus

A well-documented and well-illustrated account of the bubonic-plague epidemic that struck England in 1665—66, killing some 20 percent of London's inhabitants. Before examining the Great Plague ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Booksloth - LibraryThing

Stephen Porter's non-fiction account of The Great Plague isn't a long book and covers the 1665-6 epidemic of the Bubonic Plague in England. If you need a reference work on the subject then this one is ... Read full review

Contents

Plague and Society
7
The Great Plague in London
29
The Plague in the Provinces
61
Policy and Plague
86
The Great Plague in Perspective
129
Notes
153
Acknowledgements
171
List of Illustrations
173
Bibliography
177
Index
185
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About the author (2009)

Stephen Porter is an acknowledged expert on London's history. His other books include The Great Plague ('An excellent introduction' Sunday Telegraph), London: A History in Paintings & Illustrations ('Glorious... brings London vividly to life' Simon Jenkins) & Pepys's London ('A compelling, lively account' BBC History Magazine). He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and of the Royal Historical Society. After twenty-five years living in the capital he now lives in Stratford-Upon-Avon.

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