Black, Brown, & Beige: Surrealist Writings from Africa and the Diaspora

Front Cover
University of Texas Press, Dec 7, 2009 - Literary Collections - 395 pages
0 Reviews

Surrealism as a movement has always resisted the efforts of critics to confine it to any static definition--surrealists themselves have always preferred to speak of it in terms of dynamics, dialectics, goals, and struggles. Accordingly, surrealist groups have always encouraged and exemplified the widest diversity--from its start the movement was emphatically opposed to racism and colonialism, and it embraced thinkers from every race and nation.

Yet in the vast critical literature on surrealism, all but a few black poets have been invisible. Academic histories and anthologies typically, but very wrongly, persist in conveying surrealism as an all-white movement, like other "artistic schools" of European origin. In glaring contrast, the many publications of the international surrealist movement have regularly featured texts and reproductions of works by comrades from Martinique, Haiti, Cuba, Puerto Rico, South America, the United States, and other lands. Some of these publications are readily available to researchers; others are not, and a few fall outside academia's narrow definition of surrealism.

This collection is the first to document the extensive participation of people of African descent in the international surrealist movement over the past seventy-five years. Editors Franklin Rosemont and Robin D. G. Kelley aim to introduce readers to the black, brown, and beige surrealists of the world--to provide sketches of their overlooked lives and deeds as well as their important place in history, especially the history of surrealism.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 The First Black Surrealists
21
Surrealism in the Caribbean Cuba Martinique Haiti Dominican Republic Trinidad Puerto Rico
61
Brazil Guyana Colombia
115
Cairo North Africa the Maghreb SubSaharan Africa Madagascar
135
5 Surrealist Beginnings in the United States 1930s1950s
193
6 The 1950s Surrealist Underground in the United States
219
7 Surrealism Black Power Black Arts
237
The Mid1970s through the 1990s
285
Surrealism Today and Tomorrow
315
Surrealism and the Creation of a Desirable Future
349
Bibliography
363
Index
381
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

FRANKLIN ROSEMONT, editor of the Surrealist Revolution Series published by the University of Texas Press, was welcomed into the surrealist group in Paris in 1966 by renowned surrealist André Breton. Rosemont has contributed to many international surrealist exhibitions and journals, among them Analogon in Prague and L’Archibras in Paris. Among his books are Jacques Vaché and the Roots of Surrealism, Revolution in the Service of the Marvelous, An Open Entrance to the Shut Palace of Wrong Numbers, and Lamps Hurled at the Stunning Algebra of Ants.

ROBIN D. G. KELLEY, a distinguished scholar of African American history, is Professor of History and American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class; Yo’ Mama’s Disfunktional! Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America; Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination; To Make Our World Anew: A History of African Americans (with Earl Lewis); and, most recently, Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original.

Bibliographic information