France in 1829-30, Volume 2

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Saunders and Otley, 1831 - France
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Page 51 - These our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits and Are melted into air, into thin air: And, like the baseless fabric of this vision, The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve And, like this unsubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind.
Page 84 - L'absence aux vrais amants est encor plus funeste ; et moi qui, soixante ans après lui, viens faire parler une vieille Jocaste d'un vieil amour ; et tout cela pour complaire au goût le plus fade et le plus faux qui ait jamais corrompu la littérature?
Page 414 - I did not hear the announce of " Madame est servie" without emotion. We proceeded to the diningroom, not, as in England, by the printed orders of the red book, but by the law of the courtesy of nations, whose only distinctions are made in favour of the greatest strangers. The evening was extremely sultry ; and in spite of Venetian blinds and open verandas, the apartments through which we passed were exceedingly close. A dinner in the largest of them threatened much inconvenience from the heat. But...
Page 417 - Pasta or Sontag (divine as they are) were never more fairly won than the laurel which should have graced the brow of Careme for this specimen of the intellectual perfection of an art, the standard and gauge of modern civilization. Cruelty, violence, and barbarism were the characteristics of the men who fed upon the tough fibres of half-dressed oxen ; humanity, knowledge, and refinement belong to the living generation, whose tastes and temperance are regulated by the science of such philosophers as...
Page 430 - C'est, dit-on, affectation ! Veut-elle un instant se distraire, Elle aime à se montrer, dit-on ; Tout ce qu'elle ose se permettre, En mal on sait l'interpréter ; Elle ne peut parler, chanter, Sourire sans se compromettre. Son silence blesse les sots, Ses propos ne les touchent guère ; Elle doit parler par bons mots, Ou ne rien dire avec mystère. Comme un animal curieux Tantôt chacun la considère ; Tantôt, une bégueule altière Lui jette un regard dédaigneux. Un raisonneur, qui chez lui brille,...
Page 416 - ... in its composition, no trace of the wisdom of our ancestors in a single dish, — no high-spiced sauces, no dark-brown gravies, no flavour of cayenne and allspice, no tincture of catsup and walnut pickle, no visible agency of those vulgar elements of cooking of the good old times, fire and water. Distillations of the most delicate viands, extracted in silver dews, with chemical precision — ' On tepid clouds of rising steam
Page 416 - English tables) anticipated the stronger shock, and broke it, of the exquisite avalanche, which, with the hue and odour of fresh-gathered nectarines, satisfied every sense and dissipated every coarser flavour. ' With less genius than went to the composition of this dinner, men have written epic poems...
Page 483 - The shawl was still a novelty in France, when Josephine, as yet but the wife of the First Consul, knew not how to drape its elegant folds, and stood indebted to the brusque Rapp for the grace with which she afterwards wore it. " ' Permittez que je vous fasse 1'observation,' said Rapp, as they were setting off for the opera ; ' que votre schall n'est pas mis avec cette grace qui vous est habituelle.
Page 415 - ... how well the masters of the feast had consulted the genius of the place in all. To do justice to the science and research of a dinner so served would require a knowledge of the art equal to that which produced it; its character, however, was, that it was in season, that it was up to its...
Page 415 - To do justice to the science and research of a dinner so served would require a knowledge of the art equal to that which produced it ; its character, however, was, that it was in season, — that it was up to its time, — that it was in the spirit of the age, — that there was no perruque in its composition, no trace of the wisdom of our ancestors...

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