Dutch Chicago: A History of the Hollanders in the Windy City

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Nov 7, 2002 - History - 908 pages
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Now at least 250,000 strong, the Dutch in greater Chicago have lived for 150 years "below the radar screens" of historians and the general public. Indeed, with their strong entrepreneurial spirit and isolationist streak, they have flourished in modern American society while managing to maintain much of their distinctive heritage. Here their story is told for the first time, as internationally renowned immigration historian Robert Swierenga presents a colorful, comprehensive history of the Dutch Americans who have made their home in the Windy City since the mid-1800s. Dutch Chicago is the first serious work on its subject, and it promises to be the definitive history. Swierenga's engaging narrative, replete with historical detail and anecdotes, is accompanied by more than 250 photographs and illustrations. Substantial appendixes list Dutch-owned garbage and cartage companies and Reformed churches and schools in greater Chicago. This book will be enjoyed by readers with Dutch roots as well as by anyone interested in America's rich ethnic diversity.
 

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Contents

Dutch Chicago Takes Shape
xix
Like Mother Like Daughter Dutch Calvinism in America
47
Guided by God Is Guided Well The Founding Years
75
Pulpit and Pew in the Heyday of the Groninger Hoek
132
White Flight Reformed Churches Seek the Suburbs
209
Churches of Roseland The Frisian Settlement
293
Feeders of the Church Christian Schools
348
A Covenanted Community Church Social Life
448
Buying Dutch Stores and Services
648
Help a Hollander Ethnic Politics
674
The Other Hollanders Jews and Catholics
714
The Dutch Reformed as a Covenanted Community
743
Chicago Dutch Garbage Companies
754
Chicago Dutch Cartage Companies
784
Churches Schools and Missions
792
Societies and Clubs
800

From Womb to Tomb Mutual Aid Societies and Cemeteries
496
The Elites Dutch American Social Clubs
524
Plowing in Hope Truck Farming and Agricultural Colonization
549
Business Is Picking Up Garbage and Cartage
574
Church Membership 18531978
802
Bibliography
817
Index
836
Copyright

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Page 4 - The city is situated on both sides of the Chicago River, a sluggish slimy stream, too lazy to clean itself, and on both sides of its north and south branches, upon a level piece of ground, half dry and half wet, resembling a salt marsh, and contained a population of 20,000.
Page 4 - To render the streets and side walks passable, they were covered with deal boards from house to house, the boards resting upon cross sills of heavy timber. This kind of track is called "the plank road." Under these planks the water was standing on the surface over three-fourths of the city, and as the sewers from the houses were emptied under them, a frightful odour was emitted in summer, causing fevers and other diseases, foreign to the climate.

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About the author (2002)

Robert P. Swierenga is Albertus C. Van Raalte Research Professor of History at the A.C. Van Raalte Institute, Hope College, Holland, Michigan. A specialist in Dutch immigration history, Swierenga was knighted in 2000 by Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands.

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