With Gun and Guide

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G.W. Jacobs, 1910 - Hunting - 337 pages
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Page 41 - I'll read, his for his love." XXXIII. Full many a glorious morning have I seen Flatter the mountain tops with sovereign eye, Kissing with golden face the meadows green, Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy; Anon permit the basest clouds to ride With ugly rack on his celestial face, And from the forlorn world his visage hide, Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace : Even so my sun one early morn did shine With...
Page 74 - tis not to come ; if it be not to come, it will be now ; if it be not now, yet it will come : the readiness is all...
Page 162 - And wilt thou have me fashion into speech The love I bear thee, finding words enough, And hold the torch out, while the winds are rough, Between our faces, to cast light on each? — I drop it at thy feet. I cannot teach My hand to hold my spirit so far off From myself - me — that I should bring thee proof In words, of love hid in me out of reach.
Page 122 - Oft expectation fails, and most oft there Where most it promises ; and oft it hits, Where hope is coldest, and despair most sits.
Page 258 - I experienced no difficulty in reaching the top of this one, and never before did I enjoy so noble an exhilaration of motion. The slender tops fairly flapped and swished in the passionate torrent, bending and swirling backward and forward, round and round, tracing indescribable combinations of vertical and horizontal curves, while I clung with muscles firm braced, like a bobolink on a reed.
Page 118 - To work my mind, when body's work's expired. For then my thoughts, from far where I abide, Intend a zealous pilgrimage to thee, And keep my drooping eyelids open wide...
Page 6 - Hunting, it is the noblest exercise, Makes men laborious, active, wise, Brings health, and doth the spirits delight, It helps the hearing and the sight : It teacheth arts that never slip The memory, good horsemanship, Search, sharpness, courage, and defence, And chaseth all ill habits thence.
Page 86 - ... language well understood by man, and better understood among the several tribes, each of which speaks an idiom of its own. Most of the passions and emotions named are also expressed in the soft beaming or the flash of the eye, the...
Page 309 - The trails of the world be countless, and most of the trails be tried; You tread on the heels of the many, till you come where the ways divide ; And one lies safe in the sunlight, and the other is dreary and wan, Yet you look aslant at the Lone Trail, and the Lone Trail lures you on.
Page 258 - Spruces that were growing close, together like a tuft of grass ; no one of which seemed likely to fall unless all the rest fell with it. Though comparatively young, they were about 100 feet high, and their lithe, brushy tops were rocking and swirling in wild ecstasy.

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