The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volume 1

Front Cover
Donald H. Reiman, Neil Fraistat
JHU Press, Dec 14, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 544 pages
0 Reviews

A milestone in literary scholarship, the publication of the Johns Hopkins edition of The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley makes available for the first time critically edited clear texts of all poems and translations that Shelley published or circulated among friends, as well as diplomatic texts of his significant incomplete poetic drafts and fragments. Edited upon historical principles by Donald H. Reiman and Neil Fraistat, the multi volume edition will offer more poems and fragments than any previous collective edition, arranged in the order of their first circulation. These texts are followed by the most extensive collations hitherto available and detailed commentaries that describe their contextual origins and subsequent reception. Rejected passages of released poems appear as supplements to those poems, while other poetic drafts that Shelley rejected or left incomplete at his death will be grouped according to either their publication histories or the notebooks in which they survive.

Volume One includes Shelley's first four works containing poetry (all prepared for publication before his expulsion from Oxford), as well as "The Devil's Walk" (circulated in August 1812), and a series of short poems that he sent to friends between 1809 and 1814, including a bawdy satire on his parents and "Oh wretched mortal," a poem never before published. An appendix discusses poems lost or erroneously attributed to the young Shelley.

"These early poems are important not only biographically but also aesthetically, for they provide detailed evidence of how Shelley went about learning his craft as a poet, and the differences between their tone and that of his mature short poetry index a radical change in his self-image... The poems in Volume I, then, demonstrate Shelley's capacity to write verse in a range of stylistic registers. This early verse, even in its most abandoned forays into Sensibility, the Gothic, political satire, and vulgarity—perhaps especially in these most apparently idiosyncratic gestures—provides telling access to its own cultural moment, as well as to Shelley's art and thought in general."—from the Editorial Overview

-- Jack Stillinger, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VI
3
VIII
7
X
9
XI
11
XIII
13
XV
14
XVI
15
XVII
16
LXI
144
LXII
145
LXIV
147
LXV
149
LXVI
189
LXVII
235
LXVIII
261
LXIX
281

XVIII
17
XIX
18
XX
19
XXI
20
XXII
21
XXIV
22
XXV
28
XXVI
30
XXVII
37
XXVIII
41
XXIX
89
XXX
92
XXXI
93
XXXII
95
XXXIII
99
XXXIV
100
XXXV
101
XXXVI
102
XXXVII
105
XLI
109
XLII
110
XLIII
111
XLV
114
XLVI
115
XLVII
116
XLIX
119
L
123
LI
128
LII
131
LIII
135
LIV
136
LV
138
LVII
139
LIX
140
LX
142
LXX
295
LXXI
331
LXXII
333
LXXIII
335
LXXIV
355
LXXV
375
LXXVI
387
LXXVIII
403
LXXIX
411
LXXX
429
LXXXI
433
LXXXII
435
LXXXIV
437
LXXXV
438
LXXXVI
441
LXXXVII
442
LXXXVIII
443
LXXXIX
444
XC
448
XCI
451
XCII
452
XCIII
453
XCV
455
XCVI
456
XCVIII
457
XCIX
458
C
466
CI
469
CIV
478
CV
480
CVI
482
CVII
487
CVIII
491
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Donald H. Reiman is the co-editor of Shelley and his Circle, a catalogue edition of relevant manuscripts in the Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection at the New York Public Library, and an adjunct professor of English at the University of Delaware. Neil Fraistat is a professor of English at the University of Maryland. He is a founder and general editor of the "Romantic Circles" website, published by the University of Maryland.

Bibliographic information