A Treatise on Files and Rasps Descriptive and Illustrated: for the Use of Master Mechanics, Dealers, & C ...: With a Description of the Process of Manufacture, and a Few Hints on the Care and Use of the File, Volume 1

Front Cover
Nicholson File Company, 1878 - Files and rasps - 79 pages
 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 69 - In using the larger files, intended to be operated by both hands, the handle should be grasped in such a manner that its end will fit into, and bring up against, the fleshy part of the palm, below the joint of the little finger, with the thumb lying along the top of the handle, in the direction of its length ; the ends of the fingers pointing upwards, or nearly in the direction of the operator's face.
Page 69 - In holding the file with one hand, .as is often necessary in filing light work, pins, etc., the handle should be grasped as already described, with the exception that the hand should be turned a quarter turn, bringing the forefinger on top, and lying along the handle nearly in the direction of its length. In this position, the freest action of the hand and wrist may be made upon light work.
Page 69 - ... or nearly in the direction of the operator's face. The point of the file should be grasped by the thumb and first two fingers, the hand being so held as will bring the thumb, as its ball presses upon the top of the file, in a line with the handle, when heavy strokes are required. When a light stroke is wanted, and the pressure demanded becomes less, the thumb and fingers may change their direction, until the thumb lies at a right angle, or nearly so, with the length of the file ; the positions...
Page 65 - ... market will not stand this amount of driving, without splitting; in such cases, the tang of an old or worn-out file, of similar dimensions, should be heated, taking care, of course, not to draw the temper, and the hole in the handle burned out to nearly the desired size and shape, before driving it upon the tang. It not infrequently happens that the tang hole is not drilled central, or is badly out of line; this may also be corrected by using a heated tang. Of the many file handles of special...
Page 57 - The rows of teeth are spaced progressively wider, from the point toward the middle of the file, by regular increments of spacing, and progressively narrower, from the middle toward the heel, by regular decrements of spacing." 2. " This general law of the spacing of the teeth is modified by introducing, as they are cut, an element of controllable irregularity as to their spacing; which irregularity is confined within maximum and minimum limits, but is not a regular increment or decrement.
Page 64 - ... favorable circumstances, the file should have a convexity given to its surface. Convexity in Files. Undoubtedly few, even of the old filers, have given the subject of convexity as it bears upon broad surface filing, the thought it is entitled to. It is known to many mechanics that a file which will bite and cling, with the accustomed downward pressure, upon wrought iron, or soft steel, will require a greater pressure to prevent it from glazing or slipping over the work, when applied to broad...
Page 57 - This general law of the spacing of the teeth is modified by introducing, as they are cut, an element of controllable irregularity as to their spacing; which irregularity is confined within maximum and minimum limits, but is not a regular increment or decrement." 3. " In arranging the teeth of files so that the successive rows shall not be exactly parallel, but cut slightly angularly with respect to each other — the angle of inclination being reversed (during the operation of cutting) as necessity...
Page 71 - ... advancing stroke, and that equal pressure during the back stroke must be very damaging to the points of the teeth. Draw-Filing. Files are sometimes used by grasping at each end, and moving them sidewise across the work, after the manner of using the spoke-shave. This operation is known as draw-filing, and is Usually performed in laying the strokes of turned work, lengthwise, instead of circular, as left from the lathe finish, as well as when giving a final fit to the shaft that is to receive...

Bibliographic information