The History of Yucatan: From Its Discovery to the Close of the Seventeenth Century

Front Cover
John Murray, 1854 - Yucatán (Mexico : State) - 340 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 65 - I knew what it was," said he, " to trust to your false promises, Malinche ; I knew that you had destined me to this fate, since I did not fall by my own hand when you entered my city of Tenochtitlan. Why do you slay me so unjustly ? God will demand it of you...
Page 56 - ... coming even a quarter of a league, ye shall see the Cross, which will appear and lighten up the sky from pole to pole. The worship of vain gods shall cease. Your father comes, O Itzalanos ! Your brother comes, 0 Tantunites ! Receive your barbarous bearded guests from the East, who bring the signal of God who comes to us in mercy and pity. The time of our life is coming. You have 'nothing to fear from the world. Thou art the living God, who created us in mercy. The words of God are good : let...
Page 31 - ... idols, which were no gods, but evil beings, by which they were led into error and their souls sent to hell. He then presented them with the image of the Virgin Mary and a cross, which he desired them to put up instead. These would procure a blessing to them at all times, make their seeds grow, and preserve their souls from eternal perdition.
Page 21 - ... de haber sabido nueva del, de que se presume, pues tal nueva del hasta hoy no se sabe, que debe de tener ó estar en alguna ó extrema necesidad de socorro...
Page 21 - Dolid qne fue en seguimiento del dicho Juan de Grijalva, sabréis si allegó á la dicha isla, é si saben que derrota llevó, ó si tienen ó sepan alguna nueva de á donde está é como.
Page 106 - ... but a step, and with the first appearance of activity all contentions ceased. Directly after this, Montejo, in the multiplicity of cares attending his duties in Chiapa, and wishing to relieve his mind of the additional anxieties consequent on the conducting of the campaign in the peninsula, sent for his son, and by a formal act substituted him in all the powers conferred on himself by Charles the Fifth, for the subjugation and pacification of Yucatan. He could not have made a better selection,...
Page 21 - ... que en este caso pudiéredes, y el tiempo para ello diere lugar, y todo lo que mas y mejor os pareciere que al servicio de Dios nuestro Señor é de sus Altezas conviene. ítem : llegado que á la dicha isla Santa Cruz seais y por todas las otras tierras donde...
Page 69 - Spaniards came in sight, pushed off at once into their canoes into the broadest part of the lake, before their flight could be stopped. Finding that no further progress could then be made, Cortes sent back word for the army to move forward, and encamped them in the deserted village. They did not fare so badly here, for there were fields of maize in plenty, and the lake afforded them fish, though Bernal Diaz grumbles at its quality.
Page 14 - ... and other jewels like lizards and three necklaces of hollow beads, and other articles of gold but not of much value, for they were not worth more than two hundred dollars. They also brought some cloaks and skirts, such as they wear, and said that we must accept these things in good part as they had no more gold to give us, but that further on, in the direction of the sunset, there was plenty of gold, and they said "Colua, Colua, Mejico, Mejico," but we did not know what this Colua or Mejico could...
Page 31 - Cortes ordered the caziques, with the principal men among them and the priest, into his presence, giving them to understand, as well as he could by means of our interpreter, that if they were desirous of becoming our brethren they must give up sacrificing to these idols, which were no gods but evil beings, by which they were led into error and their...

Bibliographic information