Indexing and Abstracting in Theory and Practice

Front Cover
University of Illinois, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, 1998 - Abstracting - 412 pages
2 Reviews
A textbook for a course in either an academic or a professional education program for librarians. Reviews the principles, practice, consistency, and quality of indexing; the types and functions of abstracts; natural language in informating retrieval; and the future of indexing and abstracting services. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

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User Review  - Maylangthang - Goodreads

I'd love to read it !! Read full review

Review: Indexing and Abstracting in Theory and Practice

User Review  - Rita Johnson - Goodreads

Have to read this for a class. It is slightly more interesting than the instructor's written lectures, but still very dry. The information is great. I would just need to hook myself up to a caffeine iv to be able to ever finish the book. Read full review

Contents

Chapter l
1
Chapter 3
20
Chapter 4
44
Chapter 5
62
Two approaches to indexing an article entitled When Bystanders Just Stand By
72
Two approaches to indexing an article entitled A Childrens Literature Course for Parents
73
Two approaches to indexing an article entitled Mentoring in Graduate Schools of Education
74
A New Tool for Reading Instruction
75
The EJC system of role indicators
183
Semantic infixes in the Western Reserve system
185
Role indicators of the Western Reserve system
186
Telegraphic abstract as stored in electronic form
187
Precision devices create smaller classes recall devices build larger ones
190
Chapter 12
192
Sample entry from the Book House fiction database
198
Sample of a novel indexed using the Pejtersen approach
199

Chapter 6
77
Factors affecting the results of a search in a database
78
Sample of subject index entries from Sociology of Education
79
Example of an important item missed by simple indexer omission
80
Factors that may affect the quality of indexing
83
Indexer consistency related to user interests
86
Chapter 7
87
Indexing standard for a medical article
90
Scoring of two indexers against the standard of Figure 37
91
Indicative abstract
95
Example of a critical abstract
99
Framework for a structured abstract
100
Block diagram abstract
101
Modular abstracts
102
Modular index entries
103
Comparison of miniabstract authors summary and abstracts from Chemical Abstracts and Biological Abstracts
104
Chapter 8
107
Abstracting principles published by the Defense Documentation Center 1968
109
Example of a highly formatted abstract
112
Key information needed by clinicians in structured abstract
113
Essentials of abstracting
115
Hypothetical results from a test of relevance predictability
118
Chapter 9
120
Rules for abstractors that relate to retrievability characteristics of abstracts
123
Evaluation Aspects
127
Growth of the scholarly literature on AIDS
132
Hypothetical example of distribution of superconductor items
139
Example of entries from Cumulated Index Medicus
152
Sample entries from subject index to the Engineering
158
Sample entries from subject index to Chemical Abstracts
164
Abstracts
168
Sample entries from an index of the type used in the Excerpta Medica series
169
Sample entries from the Current Technology Index
170
Sample entries from the Social Sciences Citation Index
171
Chapter 11
172
Sample page from Current Contents
174
Sample entries from the title word index to Current Contents
175
Enhancing the Indexing
178
Two possible synopses for The Story of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
202
Example of an entry from Masterplots
204
Linguistic structures to guide the annotation and indexing of fiction
205
Chapter 13
206
Main levels of abstraction in an art museum database
207
Sample catalog entry for a painting
209
Incremental querying of an image database
211
A query made to a meteorological database
212
Two weather maps retrieved in response to the Figure 101 query
213
Chapter 14
222
Comparison of abstract and indexing using a controlled vocabulary
230
The pros and cons of free text versus controlled vocabulary
232
Example of entry in the TERM database
248
Chapter 15
251
The essential problems of information retrieval
253
Example of thesaurus entries derived by automatic methods
265
Citationreference linkages
266
Chapter 16
267
Example of a Luhn autoabstract
268
Example of an extract produced by the ADAM automatic abstracting system
271
Text relationship map
275
Initial search of help desk database
289
Browsing help desk database
290
Most highly ranked cases selected
291
Case summary with action recommended
292
Indexing and the Internet
298
Chapter 17
314
Filtering levels in a digital library environment
315
Levels of access to electronic resources
317
Possible levels of access to electronic resources
318
Interacting components in a digital library network
319
Chapter 18
325
Chapter 19
339
Appendices
348
References
366
Index
398
Copyright

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