Spellbound

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Hodder & Stoughton, 1989 - Metamorphosis - 191 pages
2 Reviews
Alfred Hitchcock takes on Sigmund Freud in this thriller in which psychologist Ingrid Bergman tries to solve a murder by unlocking the clues hidden in the mind of amnesiac suspect Gregory Peck. Among the highlights is a bizarre dream sequence seemingly designed by Salvador Dali--complete with huge eyeballs and pointy scissors. Although the film is in black and white, the original release contained one subliminal blood-red frame, appearing when a gun pointed directly at the camera goes off. Spellbound is one of Hitchcock's strangest and most atmospheric films, providing the director with plenty of opportunities to explore what he called "pure cinema"--i.e., the power of pure visual associations. Miklós Rózsa's haunting score (which features a creepy theremin) won an Oscar, and the movie was nominated for best picture, director, supporting actor (Michael Chekhov), cinematography, and special visual effects.

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Review: Spellbound

User Review  - Amy Mair - Goodreads

I loved these teen thrillers in middle school. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nx74defiant - LibraryThing

A good Young Adult Thriller. Read full review

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About the author (1989)

Christopher Pike is the pseudonym of Kevin Christopher McFadden, one of America's most popular young adult fiction writers. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 12, 1954, but grew up in Los Angeles, California. He took on various jobs before writing Slumber Party, Weekend, and Chain Letter, all of which became bestsellers. His other works include The Last Vampire series; the Final Friends trilogy; The Lost Mind; Witch; Whisper of Death; Alosha; The Yanti; Bury Me Deep; and Fall into Darkness. He also writes the children's series Spooksville and adult novels including Sati; The Season of Passage; The Listeners; The Cold One; The Blind Mirror and Falling.

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