Camden Miscellany, Volume 9

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Camden Society, 1895 - Great Britain
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Page 22 - Put not your trust in princes, nor in the sons of men, for in them there is no salvation."*** He was soon able, however, to collect his courage; and he prepared himself to suffer the fatal sentence.
Page 9 - Ellis. 10. A Chronicle of the First Thirteen Years of the reign of Edward IV., by John Warkworth, DD Edited by JO Halliwell. 11. Kemp's Nine Daies Wonder, performed in a Daunce from London to Norwich.
Page 12 - Grants, &c., from the Crown during the reign of Edward V. and two Speeches for opening Parliament, by John Russell, Bishop of Lincoln, Lord Chancellor. Edited by JG Nichols.
Page 13 - Lake's Account of his Interviews with Charles I. on being created a Baronet. Edited by TP Langmead. 6. The Letters of Pope to Atterbury, when in the Tower of London.
Page 1 - SOCIETY is to perpetuate, and render accessible, whatever is valuable, but at present little known, amongst the materials for the Civil, Ecclesiastical, or Literary History of the United Kingdom...
Page 1 - It was instituted to perpetuate, and render accessible, whatever is valuable, but hitherto little known, amongst the materials for the Civil, Ecclesiastical, or Literary History of the United Kingdom ; and it accomplishes that object by the publication of Historical Documents, Letters, Ancient Poems, and whatever else lies within the compass of its design, in the most convenient form, and at the least possible expense consistent with the production of useful volumes.
Page 10 - Rutland Papers. Original Documents illustrative of the Courts and Times of Henry VII. and Henry VIII.
Page 9 - Ecclesiastical Documents : viz. — i. A Brief History of the Bishoprick of Somerset from its Foundation to 1174. 2. Charters from the Library of Dr. Cox Macro.
Page 23 - I did yesterday satisfy the justice of the kingdom, by 'passing of the bill of attainder against the earl of Strafford; but mercy being as inherent and inseparable to a king as justice, I desire at this time in some measure, to show that likewise, by suffering that unfortunate man to fulfil the natural course of his life in a close imprisonment...

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