Oil Fields of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coastal Plain

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1903 - Oil fields - 174 pages
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Page 139 - ... not indigenous to the strata in which they are found, but are the resultant products of columns of hot saline waters which have ascended, under hydrostatic pressure, at points along lines of structural weakness, through thousands of feet of shale, sand, and marine littoral sediments of the Coastal Plain section, through which oil and sand are disseminated in more or less minute quantities. The oil, with sulphur, may have been floated upward on these waters, and the salt and dolomite may have...
Page 139 - The oil and salt pockets of the Texas coastal plain are probably not Indigenous to the strata in which they are found, but are the resultant products of columns of hot saline waters which have ascended, under hydrostatic pressure, at points along lines of structural weakness, through thousands of feet of shale, sand and marine littoral sediments of the coast plain section, through which oil and sand are disseminated in more or less minute quantities.
Page 162 - The lower end of the drill rod is supplied with one of several forms of bit, adapted to the kind of material being drilled. The material loosened by the rotating bit is carried upward to the surface by the water ascending on the outside. This ascending current of water keeps the hole clean and allows the drill rod to turn freely. It is essential that the flow of water should be continuous, and a drilling outfit is always supplied with two force pumps in order to avoid any danger of stopping the flow....
Page 139 - The channels of these ascending waters may have been in places of structural weakness, such as fissures, which probably at one time continued to the surface, but may have been sealed by the deposition of the later overlapping strata now capping the oil pools. Many facts may be adduced in support of this hypothesis, although it must be admitted that it presents some serious difficulties. The mode of accumulation of the enormous masses of rock salt which occur in the Louisiana Salt Islands, in Damon...
Page 23 - There are also occasional deposits of red clay. These beds are sometimes thinly stratified or laminated, but frequently massive. The laminated beds are usually interstratified with thin beds of blue and gray or grayish-white sand. The clays carry considerable quantities of calcareous nodules irregularly distributed, in many places shells of Pleistocene or Recent age, and great quantities of decaying wood in the form of tree trunks, bark and leaves. Among these the cypress appears as the most prominent,...
Page 107 - ... by, which show no traces of oil." The results of this investigation by Doctor Turner, while not absolutely conclusive, indicate that some other source for this oil must be sought than the diatoms. Since, as shown above, it is entirely improbable that the oil was derived from Beaumont by floating upon the surface of the water; the only other source assignable is from the underlying strata. It does not necessarily follow, even if this is the case, that this region is underlain by a commercial deposit...
Page 166 - ... comes out with the oil as differing from the dry gas found higher. The former is spoken of as poisonous, while the latter is thought to be harmless. The distinguishing characteristic of the lower and deadly gas is probably sufficiently accounted for by the following quotation from Hayes and Kennedy: "This gas contains a large proportion of hydrogen sulphide and its poisonous qualities are intensified by its being saturated with petroleum vapor. Petroleum vapor has the effect of rendering persons...
Page 140 - The mode of accumulation of of the enormous masses of rock salt which occur in the Louisiana Salt Islands, in Damon Mound, in High Island, and also in Spindletop has never been satisfactorily explained. For a variety of reasons it does not seem possible that they can be the result of evaporation of sea water in natural salt pans, which is supposed to be the origin of most deposits of rock salt. It may therefore be necessary to...
Page 156 - The most thorough practical experiments, with the view of testingthe full value of the Beaumont petroleum, have been made by Prof. James E. Denton, of the Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ These tests were made in the plant of the West Side Hygeia Ice Company, of New York. From the data thus obtained it appears that this petroleum has an evaporative power of 15.29 to 15.55 pounds of water per pound of oil used. Of the steam generated 3.1 to 4.8 per cent was used by the burner in spraying...
Page 139 - ... lines of structural weakness, through thousands of feet of shale, sand, and marine littoral sediments of the Coastal Plain section, through which oil and sand are disseminated in more or less minute quantities. The oil, with sulphur, may have been floated upward on these waters, and the salt and dolomite may have been crystallized from the saturated solution. The channels of these ascending waters may have been in places of structural weakness, such as fissures, which probably at one time continued...