The phantom ship, Volume 191

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G. Routledge & Company, 1857 - Adventure stories - 316 pages
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Page 315 - That young lady had a talent for describing the involvements and feelings and characters of ordinary life which is to me the most wonderful I ever met with. The Big Bow-wow strain I can do myself like any now going, but the exquisite touch which renders ordinary commonplace things and characters interesting from the truth of the description and the sentiment is denied to me.
Page 280 - ... it retreated slowly, growling and snarling. My father followed; the animal did not run, but always kept at some distance; and my father did not like to fire until he was pretty certain that his ball would take effect; thus they went on for some time, the wolf now leaving my father far behind, and then stopping and snarling defiance at him, and then, again, on his approach, setting off at speed. "Anxious to shoot the animal (for the white wolf is very rare) my father continued the pursuit for...
Page 290 - The white wolf!' exclaimed my father, 'the white wolf which decoyed me into the forest —I see it all now —I have dealt with the spirits of the Hartz Mountains.
Page 315 - Gerstaecker's books abound in adventure and scenes of excitement; and are fully equal, in that respect, to the stories either of Marryat, Cooper, or Dana.
Page 255 - ... wide streets were filled with, living beings ; elephants with gorgeous trappings ; led or mounted horses in superb housings ; palanquins, carried by natives in splendid liveries ; running footmen ; syces ; every variety of nation, from the proud Portuguese to the half-covered native ; Mussulmans, Arabs, Hindoos, Armenians ; officers and soldiers in their uniforms, all crowded and thronged together — all was bustle and motion. Such was the wealth, the splendour, and luxury of the proud city...

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