A Dream Play

Front Cover
Theatre Communications Group, 2005 - Drama - 56 pages
17 Reviews

A young woman comes from another world to see if life is really as difficult as people make it out to be.

In Strindberg’s A Dream Play, written in 1901, characters merge into each other, locations change in an instant and a locked door becomes an obsessively recurrent image.

As Strindberg himself wrote in his Preface, he wanted “to imitate the disjointed yet seemingly logical shape of a dream. Everything can happen, everything is possible and probable. Time and place do not exist.”

Caryl Churchill’s spare and resonant new version was first staged at the National Theatre, London, in a production by Katie Mitchell.


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Review: A Dream Play

User Review  - Smita - Goodreads

Not my style, but pretty good, overall. Read full review

Review: A Dream Play

User Review  - Ida Aasebøstøl - Goodreads

What people call success is only preparation for the next failure. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
5
Section 3
47
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

August Strindberg (1849-1912) is best-known for his misogyny and as the author of Miss Julie (1889). His first success came as a novelist and autobiographer. His plays (and he wrote over sixty) were deeply controversial in their time and still are to some extent. They range form bold naturalism (e.g. The father, 1887) to an entralling expressionism (e.g. The Ghost Sonata, 1907). Caryl Churchill (1938-) is probably the most respected woman dramatist in the English-speaking world. She is the author of some twenty plays including Light Shining in Buckinghamshire, Cloud Nine, Top Girls, Serious Money, The Skriker, Blue Heart, Far Away and A Number, seen and admired all over the world.

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