Schizophrenia: From Neuroimaging to Neuroscience

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2004 - Medical - 405 pages
0 Reviews
Neuroimaging techniques have made a huge contribution to our understanding of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Until now however, texts on both schizophrenia and neuroimaging have paid little attention to the overlap between these areas. This new volume is the first dedicated to unraveling how these techniques can help us better understand this complex disorder. Each chapter focuses on a particular research method, describing the nature of the findings, the main technological problems, and future possibilities. Though including sufficient methodological detail to be of value to imaging researchers, the emphasis throughout is on providing information of value to clinicians. Written and edited by leaders in schizophrenia research, this book details what structural and functional brain imaging studies have already established about schizophrenia and what developments are likely in the foreseeable future. It will be of great value to psychiatrists, neuropsychiatrists, and cognitive neuroscientists.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Early studies of brain anatomy in schizophrenia
1
Structural magnetic resonance imaging
21
Structural brain MRI studies in childhoodonset schizophrenia and childhood atypical psychosis
59
MR proton spectroscopy
73
Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging
93
Automated analysis of structural MRI data
119
Functional mapping with singlephoton emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography
167
Neuroreceptor mapping with PET and SPECT
213
Functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI
237
Event related potentials
293
Magnetoencephalography
331
Spatial analysis of ERP and EEC data
349
Towards an integrated imaging of schizophrenia
363
Index
397
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Daniel R. Weinberger is Chief of the Clinical Brain Disorders Branch and Director of the Genes, Cognition, and Psychosis Program at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) of the National Institutes of Heath (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

Bibliographic information